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An interesting observation about transparency of Vinly sound

ubitoo

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May 15, 2018
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Though, personally, I am yet to experience the sound of a Vinly, I thought FMs may find the following exchange interesting.

I once was chatting with a producer who worked for Disney for around 15 years. He said the so-called “warm” tone of vinyl vs the “harsh”
sound of CDs is really that the vinyl format acts as a partial low-pass filter.
So it’s really just that you’re hearing less high-freq sound on vinyl than on a CD.

--------------------- Reply beings --------------------------
Kind of.

Vinyl can't carry much bass, so it's cut with a special EQ curve - called the RIAA curve - that eliminates most of the bass and some of the mids.

Phono preamps have the opposite curve. In theory when the music comes of the preamp you get a flat response overall.
In reality any added distortion warms up the bass a lot, the mids some, and the treble barely at all.

Because what's left of the bass is still cut close to the dynamic range limits of vinyl, it's always distorted.
But because of the extreme EQ this rounds out the low end and gives the mids a boost.

The overall effect is a warm sound.

Vinyl isn't a true hifi medium. It's more like an Instagram filter for music. It can sound very nice, but it's a heavily processed
sound, not a realistic one.

Digital has other issues. But for ultimate fidelity, personally I would always - no exceptions - prefer to listen to a
lossless 24-bit digital recording of a master tape captured with studio-grade converters and streamed from hard disk
than from vinyl, CD, or any compressed file format.
Original Source: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19937820
The full thread is also pretty interesting - https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19937499
 
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yogibear

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For human hearing anything above 16bit is never needed. Why is 24bit ever advocated ?
 

sandeepss

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24 bit will help in studios not home listening. It should add around 20dB of dynamic range without increasing the system noise
 
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