• Hello and Welcome to HiFiVision.com - an online community for the home entertainment and tech enthusiasts!

    If you would like to ask a question, participate in a discussion and view attachments please Register yourself.

Connecting dvd transport to DAC

Home Theatre Systems

SaurabhK

Active Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2008
Messages
358
Points
43
Location
Noida
Hi,

I was in a dilemma which would be the ideal way to connect a DVD player ( used as a transport ) to an external DAC. I have 2 digital outs on my DVD. A SPIDF Co axial and a TOSLINK optical.

Would also like inputs on good brands to get for the same.

Regards,
Saurabh
 

venkatcr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
7,318
Points
113
Location
Chennai
Suarabh,

For short lengths, both optical and coaxial will give you identical performance.

Some people prefer coaxial as it is easier to get good cables (in Inda) and usage and maintenance is easier. With optical you have to ensure the cable is straight, and if you are disconnecting for some reason, you have to plug the sockets so that dust do not get in.

Cheers
 

venkatcr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
7,318
Points
113
Location
Chennai
You are right Cranky. I should have said that the optical cable should not have sudden 90 degree turns, and should be bent gently where needed. I have read somewhere that people tend to bend the cables, particularly at the connection points, to suit their placement. VDH also explains this and warns users very clearly in their optical cable usage guide.

Whether Coax is better or optical is again a debate that is fought very actively. In a major test, Secrets of Home Theater came to the conclusion that for short runs both provide similar performance, while for long runs, optical performs better. This is of course, assuming that the quality of the cables are decent, and player and amplifiers are all the same.

Cheers
 

marsilians

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2008
Messages
2,642
Points
83
Location
117.192.87.109
In a major test, Secrets of Home Theater came to the conclusion that for short runs both provide similar performance, while for long runs, optical performs better.
Cheers

I have run optical and coax for upto 20 -25ft when installing projector systems and did not see any perceivable differences in sound at all. Typically shorter runs should mean upto 15-20 meters at a minimum though I have not tested it personally.
 

SaurabhK

Active Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2008
Messages
358
Points
43
Location
Noida
So I guess a Co axial would be jsut as fine as a Optical cable. So any brands/models anyone recommends? I dont mind going slightly high end.Would be sourcing from abroad most probably.
 

venkatcr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
7,318
Points
113
Location
Chennai
There are hundreds of companies - VDH, Tara Labs. Monster, Kimber, AudioQuest, Ecosse, QED, Chord, Supra, etc.

If you are buying from the US, take a look at Blue Jeans (Digital Audio Cables at Blue Jeans Cable) You will be able to get a 6 feet Coaxial Digital cable for USD25, and that will be very very good.

Cheers
 

moserw

New Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2008
Messages
3,288
Points
0
Location
Depends...
Also check out Philips and Bandridge. I have both and they work very well. Economical too!
 

spirovious

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2008
Messages
12,563
Points
113
Location
Mumbai
I m using Bandridge OPT for listening to CDs from DVDP to Onkyo avr.
profigold coaxial for same player to play DVDs.

I m using both as opt stereo sound has more Dynamics than coax.
But for DVD surr,profigold is best for channel seperation.
 

anm

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Messages
6,136
Points
113
Location
New Delhi, India
I have both. I am deaf enough to notice any quality change. Earlier I had a sony dvd player, that i passed on to someone else.
Now I have philips and unfortunately it doesn't have an optical out, only co-axial out. So it might be a better investment in co-ax.
I think both cost me around INR 1000. Now my 1k is waiting in a drawer to be put to some use.

regards
Anant
 

anm

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Messages
6,136
Points
113
Location
New Delhi, India
why would you need to run 25-25 ft optical cable for projector installation?

regards

I have run optical and coax for upto 20 -25ft when installing projector systems and did not see any perceivable differences in sound at all. Typically shorter runs should mean upto 15-20 meters at a minimum though I have not tested it personally.
 

IndianEars

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 18, 2008
Messages
831
Points
63
Location
Mumbai
Theoritically CoAx will sound better, and the Hi Fi community will swear by Coax and Phoo Phoo optical for high quality playback. However, that is not the preformance level you are look at, with a DVD as transport.

The Optical cable eliminates any possiblity of mains 'Hum' through a Ground loop, since there is no electrical connection.
 

anm

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Messages
6,136
Points
113
Location
New Delhi, India
Wouldn't any digital connection eliminate hum as it would decode only the digital signals and leave out anything else - curious.
Has anyone ever heard a hum over coax that got eliminated by replacing it by an optical cable, every thing else / all connections being the same?

regards
 
Last edited:

gobble

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2008
Messages
5,452
Points
113
Location
Bangalore
Hi,

I was in a dilemma which would be the ideal way to connect a DVD player ( used as a transport ) to an external DAC. I have 2 digital outs on my DVD. A SPIDF Co axial and a TOSLINK optical.

Would also like inputs on good brands to get for the same.

Regards,
Saurabh

After a few weeks on googling, I've come to the conclusion that co-axial cable is the way to go. Beyond 6mts optical is risky.

Cheers
 

venkatcr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
7,318
Points
113
Location
Chennai
Wouldn't any digital connection eliminate hum as it would decode only the digital signals and leave out anything else - curious.
Has anyone ever heard a hum over coax that got eliminated by replacing it by an optical cable, every thing else / all connections being the same?

A interconnect such as coaxial or optical should never be the cause of a hum. Hum is usually caused by electrical interference.

As long as earthing is proper and all connections are properly done without any shorting, I don't see the possibility of any hum in any circuit - digital or analog. I don't remember having ever come across any hum over the last 10 years.

Use good cables with proper shielding. Use good earthing for you house or flat, and at least up to the distribution and power control/management point of your audio/video system. If you are using a stabiliser, filter, or UPS, they all should be properly earthed. Some simple precautions such as these will help you say goodbye to hum.

Cheers
 

IndianEars

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 18, 2008
Messages
831
Points
63
Location
Mumbai
I don't remember having ever come across any hum over the last 10 years.

You are indeed a Very Lucky guy my friend....:rolleyes:

Many ( Most ? ) DVD players are provided with only a 2 pin plug. Hence grounding the DVD player to an electrical 'earth' is not possible.

Most DVD players again, have an SMPS (Switched Mode Power Supply) which can put out a lot of interference and sometimes even presents a 'Live' chasis.
 

anm

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Messages
6,136
Points
113
Location
New Delhi, India
Can we attach the ground wire to the chassis of the equipment? Don't try this as I don't yet know whether this can be done or whether this can kill.

regards

You are indeed a Very Lucky guy my friend....:rolleyes:

Many ( Most ? ) DVD players are provided with only a 2 pin plug. Hence grounding the DVD player to an electrical 'earth' is not possible.

Most DVD players again, have an SMPS (Switched Mode Power Supply) which can put out a lot of interference and sometimes even presents a 'Live' chasis.
 

venkatcr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
7,318
Points
113
Location
Chennai
Many ( Most ? ) DVD players are provided with only a 2 pin plug. Hence grounding the DVD player to an electrical 'earth' is not possible.

And that is the reason I said, 'Use good earthing for you house or flat, and at least up to the distribution and power control/management point of your audio/video system.'

I am not lucky. When I rewired my house, one intelligent thing I did was install excellent earthing. The electrician was a bit surprised by my excess, but it has paid me dividends. It has protected my equipment from damage, and I have never had any shorting of any kind.

When you use a two pin plug, ensure that you use the correct polarity when you insert it in the socket. That way you will avoid any damage to the system, and also hopefully not set off any hum.

Cheers
 

gobble

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2008
Messages
5,452
Points
113
Location
Bangalore
When you use a two pin plug, ensure that you use the correct polarity when you insert it in the socket. That way you will avoid any damage to the system, and also hopefully not set off any hum.

Cheers

You mean if I flip a 2-pin upside down, it will mess up my equipment? :eek:

I never saw anything happen with other electrical equipment, whichever way I put it .... ?? :confused:

Regards
 

venkatcr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
7,318
Points
113
Location
Chennai
You mean if I flip a 2-pin upside down, it will mess up my equipment? :eek:

I never saw anything happen with other electrical equipment, whichever way I put it .... ?? :confused:

Regards

No No, it will not mess up your equipment. In general you can use a two way plug any way. But certain audio/video equipment have a fuse on the 'live' side. If you have a sudden spike or suge, having the correct polarity will protect your equipment by blowing the fuse. That is the reason US two pin plugs can be connected only one way in US sockets. One plug is wider than the other.

If you can determine which plug carries the live power, it is safer to connect that to the live socket.

Generally in a well wired house, shorting if it happens will be taken care of by the trip in the mains.

Cheers
 

amol12

Active Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2008
Messages
406
Points
28
Location
Pune
You are indeed a Very Lucky guy my friend....:rolleyes:

Many ( Most ? ) DVD players are provided with only a 2 pin plug. Hence grounding the DVD player to an electrical 'earth' is not possible.

Most DVD players again, have an SMPS (Switched Mode Power Supply) which can put out a lot of interference and sometimes even presents a 'Live' chasis.
Although this is digressing from the topic, I would like to know a solution to similar problem(s) I have.
I do have this live chassis problem and even if I flip the plug it remains. Further I get an electric shock if i touch bare end points of any of the connectors on TV/STB/AMP when DVD player is connected to TV via components.

The DVD player is connected via power strip which has inbuilt protection. If i connect it directly to the mains the problem goes way.
Same thing happens when I connect my camcorder AC adapter via a power strip.

I suspect the problem is power strips and more so the inbuilt protection in them. I have tried with 3 different makes of power strips and it exists with all of them.
 
Top