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Learn sound terms.

Home Theatre Systems

sanjivnayak

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Nov 13, 2017
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622
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Bhubaneswar
Thanks. Some commonly used terms are clear with quantitative figures. Reproducing those few useful ones.
Boomy- Excessive bass around 125 Hz .
Boxy- Heavy resonance. Emphasis around 250 to 500 Hz.
Bright- A sound that emphasizes the upper midrange/lower treble.
Brilliance- The 6kHz to 16kHz range controls the brilliance and clarity of sounds.
Chesty- A bump in the low frequency response around 125 to 250 Hz.
Cool- Progressive attenuation of frequencies below about 150Hz.
Crisp- Extended high frequency response.
Delicate- High frequencies extending to 15 or 20 kHz without peaks.
Edgy- Too much high frequency response. Distorted, having unwanted harmonics that add an edge or raspiness.
Full- Adequate level around 100 to 300 Hz. Male voices are full around 125 Hz; female voices and violins are full around 250 Hz; sax is full around 250 to 400 Hz. Opposite of thin.
Grainy- A slightly raw, exposed sound which lacks finesse. Not liquid or fluid.
Hard- Too much upper midrange, usually around 3 kHz. as if the sound is hitting you hard. Uncomfortable, forward, aggressive sound with a metallic tinge.
Harsh- Too much upper midrange. Peaks in the frequency response between 2 and 6 kHz. Or, excessive phase shift in a digital recorder's low pass filter.
Highs- The audio frequencies above about 6000 Hz.
High mid/ upper mid- The audio frequencies between about 2kHz and 6kHz.
Low mid range- frequencies between about 250Hz and 2000Hz
Mid range- The audio frequencies between about 250 Hz and 6000 Hz.
Piercing- Sharp and narrow peaks in the response around 3 to 10 kHz
Punchy- Good reproduction of dynamics. Sometimes a bump around 5 kHz or 200 Hz.
Soundstage- The area between two speakers that appears to the listener to be occupied by sonic images. Like a real stage, a soundstage should have width, depth, and height.
Sweet- Delicate. Flat high frequency response, low distortion. Lack of peaks in the response. Highs are extended to 15 or 20 kHz, but they are not bumped up.
Tight- Good low frequency transient response and detail.
Upper midrange- The audio frequencies between 2 kHz and 6 kHz.
Warm- Good bass, adequate low frequencies, adequate fundamentals relative to harmonics. Not thin. Also excessive bass or mid bass. Also, pleasantly spacious, with adequate reverberation at low frequencies. Also see Rich, Round. Warm highs means sweet highs.
 

VSTEREO

Active Member
Joined
May 7, 2016
Messages
172
Points
28
Location
Chennai
Great. Very helpful information. What about timbre? I have encountered this term many times in amplifier discussions but not sure I get it correctly.
 

Ravindra Desai

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2018
Messages
327
Points
93
Location
Kolhapur, Maharashtra. India.
Adding properties associated with frequency bands:

1. Bass: Creats the impression of height. Makes it feel 'huge.' It is direction in-sensitive. The 'Hmm' sound is used to give class monitors a tough time catching the culprit, in school.
2. Midrange: Creates the impression of loudness. It is 'volume' sensitive
3. Treble: It is direction sensitive. The 'Tss' sound is used to attract attention of someone. Typically used in college campus to make someone took towards you. :cool:

Regards,

Ravindra.
 

sanjivnayak

Active Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2017
Messages
622
Points
43
Location
Bhubaneswar
Adding properties associated with frequency bands:

1. Bass: Creats the impression of height. Makes it feel 'huge.' It is direction in-sensitive. The 'Hmm' sound is used to give class monitors a tough time catching the culprit, in school.
2. Midrange: Creates the impression of loudness. It is 'volume' sensitive
3. Treble: It is direction sensitive. The 'Tss' sound is used to attract attention of someone. Typically used in college campus to make someone took towards you. :cool:
Ravindra.
That's really funny. Such examples make one understand and remember the elusive terminologies or expressions. But wonder how guys of diametrically opposite in character (Bass being direction in-sensitive & Treble being direction sensitive) behave and stay in a cohesive group. That is a Bad-Bass (creating Hum sound) and Good-Treble creating 'Tss' sound prefer to stay together ! But in an arrangement of speaker they are placed at extreme ends. Mid range is put in between. That is unfair. Seriously.
 

Ravindra Desai

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2018
Messages
327
Points
93
Location
Kolhapur, Maharashtra. India.
That's really funny. Such examples make one understand and remember the elusive terminologies or expressions. But wonder how guys of diametrically opposite in character (Bass being direction in-sensitive & Treble being direction sensitive) behave and stay in a cohesive group. That is a Bad-Bass (creating Hum sound) and Good-Treble creating 'Tss' sound prefer to stay together ! But in an arrangement of speaker they are placed at extreme ends. Mid range is put in between. That is unfair. Seriously.
Sanjiv,
You have a gift to give a poetic approach to Audio topics and that is very rare. I really liked your post in another thread about analog v/s digital & now this one.
Keep it up!!

Regards,

Ravindra.
 

VSTEREO

Active Member
Joined
May 7, 2016
Messages
172
Points
28
Location
Chennai
May experts clarify what ‘shout’ means? In many reviews about FR designs, I have heard people saying that mid range shouts but not able to understand it correctly,yet.
 

Ravindra Desai

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2018
Messages
327
Points
93
Location
Kolhapur, Maharashtra. India.
Shout is a male sound with voice raised without bass and feelings.
The female counterpart is called scream.
Both are made to get an upperhand without much substance.

May experts clarify what ‘shout’ means? In many reviews about FR designs, I have heard people saying that mid range shouts but not able to understand it correctly,yet.

Have you heard a speech over the Ahuja alluminium P.A. horn?
That is closest that I can come up with to define a shout that you were trying to refer to.
That harsh vocals results from missing lower speech frequencies. It also results if upper mid range from 3kHz to may be 8kHz get too much prominence.

Regards,

Ravindra.
 
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