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LG - Scarlet 42LG60FR

Wharfedale Diamond 12 Series

girl21

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Dear Friends,

Need inputs on the above subject

LCD TV:
Is LG - Scarlet 42LG60FR better/good than rest of the brands (sony, samsung etc..)

Please advise

Thanks
SK
 

psychotropic

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short answer - NO!

longer answer - check them out yourself and see, but reviews seem to suggest that with regard to LCD panels LG trails behind the likes of Panasonic, Sony and Samsung.
 

vashok

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Hi
Please refer to my earlier post on " Why I bought Samsung 32A450" ?, posted couple of days back. The reviews of Scarlet series is very good. In fact PC world claims Scarlet as the best LCD TV(consumer research). CNET is critical of it, although agrees that the color is great and the setup features are quite a lot. The reviews complain of less blackness but are happy about the color details. the reviews compare Scarlet to Samsung 5 series and 6 series and Sony X or KLD? series. Sony's latest series is very higly recommended but not seen here in India. Samsung's 5 and 6 are well reviewed and still have flaws. I bought Samsung 4 series for the cost reason. All features of Scarlet will beat any other TV which is available. They are generous in number of inputs they provide. is 120Hz. Can control the picture. The viewing angle is good. The uniformity is a bit less. Beyond this, it is a matter of personal choice and opinion of viewing the actual content.

Hope this helps,
Ashok
 

reignofchaos

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How much are you planning to spend? If its close to a lac, there's only one choice... the Pioneer 428XD(4280XD) in India.
 

girl21

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LG - Scarlet 42LG60FR:) is at my place...and its real cool

now planning for a HDMI DVD player to match the LGScarlet and A/V receiver

Guys/Gals ->pls suggest a good HDMI DVD Player :confused:

how is sony DVP-NS708HP/B ????
 
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psychotropic

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I have it and it's very good....but i have no other players to compare with on my TV....but images are very crisp and clean and the colours are natural and balacned....it upscales really well.....

LG - Scarlet 42LG60FR:) is at my place...and its real cool

now planning for a HDMI DVD player to match the LGScarlet and A/V receiver

Guys/Gals ->pls suggest a good HDMI DVD Player :confused:

how is sony DVP-NS708HP/B ????
 

psychotropic

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how much did you pay for it btw?

LG - Scarlet 42LG60FR:) is at my place...and its real cool

now planning for a HDMI DVD player to match the LGScarlet and A/V receiver

Guys/Gals ->pls suggest a good HDMI DVD Player :confused:

how is sony DVP-NS708HP/B ????
 

ViniciusFarias

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Does TV have upscaling? I mean, if I connect it do a 480p DVD player by video component, will the TV upscale it to 1080p or something like that? Is there an option in the TV to do that? I have this TV but the 16:9 DVD images don´t occupy all the space on the screen. There are black targets vertically and horizontally.

By the way, for those who asked, the black levels are horrible. If you plan to watch dark-scened movies, don´t go for this TV.
 

venkatcr

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Does TV have upscaling? I mean, if I connect it do a 480p DVD player by video component, will the TV upscale it to 1080p or something like that? Is there an option in the TV to do that? I have this TV but the 16:9 DVD images don´t occupy all the space on the screen. There are black targets vertically and horizontally.

By the way, for those who asked, the black levels are horrible. If you plan to watch dark-scened movies, don´t go for this TV.

Upscaling is usually done by an external unit such as a DVD Player or an AVR. The Scarlet 42LG60FR is a Full HD TV with 1920x1080 resolution. In other words it can accept a 1080p upscaled data and display it for you. Internally it had DCDi chip from Fardoudja to remove artifacts and jagged edges, and smoothen high speed motion. The Scarlet's 120Mhz scanning should handle motion quite well.

Regarding it not displaying a full screen, this is because of what is called aspect ratio, and has nothing to do with the TV. All TVs will have the same issue with the same material.

Cheers
 

ViniciusFarias

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But if both the TV and DVD have the same aspect ratio (16:9), what would be the problem?

Upscaling is usually done by an external unit such as a DVD Player or an AVR. The Scarlet 42LG60FR is a Full HD TV with 1920x1080 resolution. In other words it can accept a 1080p upscaled data and display it for you. Internally it had DCDi chip from Fardoudja to remove artifacts and jagged edges, and smoothen high speed motion. The Scarlet's 120Mhz scanning should handle motion quite well.

Regarding it not displaying a full screen, this is because of what is called aspect ratio, and has nothing to do with the TV. All TVs will have the same issue with the same material.

Cheers
 

zoony

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The Indian Scarlet models sold in india don't have 120Mhz scanning. Another thing i noticed about the scarlet is that its got horrible side viewing angle and black levels are very poor.


Upscaling is usually done by an external unit such as a DVD Player or an AVR. The Scarlet 42LG60FR is a Full HD TV with 1920x1080 resolution. In other words it can accept a 1080p upscaled data and display it for you. Internally it had DCDi chip from Fardoudja to remove artifacts and jagged edges, and smoothen high speed motion. The Scarlet's 120Mhz scanning should handle motion quite well.

Regarding it not displaying a full screen, this is because of what is called aspect ratio, and has nothing to do with the TV. All TVs will have the same issue with the same material.

Cheers
 

Tron05

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120 hz is for NTSC signals(60hz for NTSC)
100hz for PAL signal(50hz for PAL/SECAM)

so in india you would only find 50hz/100hz..
 

ViniciusFarias

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And what about the resolution issue? Why the image don´t occupy the full screen, if the both the signal input (DVD) and the TV are 16:9?
 

venkatcr

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Tron05 said:
120 hz is for NTSC signals(60hz for NTSC)
100hz for PAL signal(50hz for PAL/SECAM)
so in india you would only find 50hz/100hz..

All TVs today, particularly, digital TVs can play both NTSC and PAL. And it is true that NTSC has a higher framerate and thus needs faster screen refreshing. At the same time, you can play NTSC signals in India, particularly from DVD Players. So if LG chooses to sell only 100MHz in India, it has to do more with company policy than anything else.

ViniciusFarias said:
Re: LG - Scarlet 42LG60FR
And what about the resolution issue? Why the image don´t occupy the full screen, if the both the signal input (DVD) and the TV are 16:9?

Vini, there are three factors in the delivery of an image. One is the TV. The second is the source - DVD player or a TV transmission. The third and very important factor is the original source format, or what some call software or media.

For a long time, TV screens were square where the height and width were nearly the same. This is called 4:3 format, or standard TV shape. Here the width is just 1.33 times the height. This is called aspect ratio.

In the days of the old movies, film was shot and projected on 35mm which also had a similar aspect ratio. So if you take a 35mm mvoie and display it on a standard screen, it will occupy the full screen.

As time went by, Hollywood producers wanted to immerse it's audience in a larger screen, and what is called widescreen became popular. This is known by different names including 70mm, scope, widescreen etc.

When digital TV came about, watching movies at home had become popular. If you take a widescreen movie and display it on a standard TV, nearly 45% of the images on both sides (or 22.5% on each) side had to be chopped off to fit the screen. If you want to display the full width, you have to proportionally squeeze the picture from all sides. When you do this, the image will occupy some 70% of the screen in the middle. In other words, there will be blank areas (or black bars) on all four sides.

So TV makers started manufacturing digital TVs that were wider than a standard TV. The new ratio was 1.78 times wider than the height. This is also called 16:9. They could no dupliacte the aspect rations of a film form multiple reasons. Most important is that the TV has to display both film and digital TV material. So a compromise aspect ratio was arrived.

When you use a TV you see two kinds of images. One is a TV program that is shot with a digital camera. The other is a movie that is shot with a film reel. Images that are shot by a digital camera can be stored on the disc in anamorphic form, meaning the picture is squeezed horizontally to fit the standard 4:3 rectangle, then unsqueezed during playback.

Things with film are different. Most movies today have an aspect ratio of 1.66, 1.85 ("flat"), or 2.40
("scope"). Since these don't match 1.33 or 1.78 TV shapes, two processes are employed to make various movie images fit the digital TV.

One is Letterbox where the image is presented in its theatrical aspect ratio, which is wider than both standard and widescreen TV. Black bars, called mattes, are used to cover the gaps at the top and bottom. A 1.85 movie that has been letterboxed for 1.33 display has thinner mattes than a 2.4 movie letterboxed to 1.33 (28% of display height vs. 44%), although the former are about the same thickness as those of a 2.4 movie letterboxed to 1.78 (26% of display height). The mattes used to letterbox a 1.85 movie for 1.78 display are so thin (2%) that they're hidden by the overscan of most widescreen TVs. Some movies, especially animated features and European films, have an aspect ratio of 1.66, which can be letterboxed for 1.33 display or sideboxed for 1.78 display.

The other method is called Pan & Scan. Here the thinner TV "window" is panned and zoomed across the wider movie picture, chopping off the sides. However, most movies today are shot soft matte, which means a full 1.33 aspect film frame is used. The cinematographer has two sets of frame marks in his viewfinder, one for 1.33 and one for 1.85, so he can allow for both formats. The top and bottom are masked off in the theater, but when the film is transferred to video the full 1.33 frame can be used in the pan & scan process. Pan & scan is primarily used for 1.33 formatting, not for 1.78 formatting, since widescreen fans prefer that letterboxing be used to preserve the theatrical effect.

Thus even if your TV and DVD Player support 16:9, the source material that is converted from a movie will be using a letter box or a pan and scan, where there will be black bars on the sides or on top and bottom. Most movies you see on a digital display will use 16:9 widescreen ratio. In other, words they will use the full width of your screen but not the full height. If you take a film like that and try to stretch it, it will be like seeing it reflected in a concave or convex mirror. Your favourite heroine will have a much fatter backside than what she really has or what you like, or it will look as if she has been squeezed from both sides.

Cheers
 

ViniciusFarias

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venkatcr,

The case is that the movies I am talking about are 16:9 as well (that is written in the case of the disc). So when I watch them there shouldn't be any bars at all on the TV, right? The disc, the DVD player and the TV all have the same aspect ratio. But what happens is that the image doesn't go for all the screen. If I put the TV to 16:9 mode, the imagem fills up the screen but it gets stretched. If I put the TV to 4:3 mode, the image gets proportionally right, but there are black bars on both sides and on top and bottom of the TV. I thought it could be because of the resolution, because, even if the aspect ratio is the same, the number of points is diferent. Thanks for your help.
 

elcaro

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venkatcr,

The case is that the movies I am talking about are 16:9 as well (that is written in the case of the disc). So when I watch them there shouldn't be any bars at all on the TV, right? The disc, the DVD player and the TV all have the same aspect ratio. But what happens is that the image doesn't go for all the screen. If I put the TV to 16:9 mode, the imagem fills up the screen but it gets stretched. If I put the TV to 4:3 mode, the image gets proportionally right, but there are black bars on both sides and on top and bottom of the TV. I thought it could be because of the resolution, because, even if the aspect ratio is the same, the number of points is diferent. Thanks for your help.


Are the movie DVDs "anamorphic widescreen"? If they are not, then they will not fill the screen and will display at the normal 480p DVD resolution.
Check the back case of the movie DVD. It should say" anamorphic" or "enhanced for widescreen TVs".

Read this for a more technical answer.
 

ViniciusFarias

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I remember there was a movie wich had anamorphic widescreen, but I don't think get right on my screen. Anyway, I saw the link you sent but it's really hard to understand. There is so many technical aspects!
 

anuragn

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@ViniciusFarias,
Try toggling the setting in your DVD player betweem PS, Widescreen & 4:3. My Onida DVD player has the option to define the aspect ratio of the display, and it proportionally fits the image on the TV...although it works sometimes, and I remember reading somewhere that most of the movies are NOT 16:9, there is very less content that is actually recorded in 16:9 aspect ratio.
 
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