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Sound above ear level

  • Thread starter Deleted member 38504
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Wharfedale Evo 4.2
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Deleted member 38504

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Something I have been thinking for quite some time.

So, how do we get good sound above ear level? This is assuming my setup is in such a way that the speakers are at ear level position when I sit on my sofa and the speakers are facing me. Problem is, the moment I get up or walk about in the room, the sound goes dead or flat from a nice deep bass and mids that I get while Im sitting on the sofa. The sound quality just dips. Is there anything that can be done? Adding another two speakers is not an option.

This is basically for music.

Thanks.
 

efernand1

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Hi

Thats where a subwoofer comes in the picture and takes care of this issue....

Some Bookshelf speakers are known to provide good bass (like the Dalis...placement specific) ...regardless of where you move in the room....

See if you can add some more hz to the bookshelf speakers
 
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Thanks ed but its not only the bass Im talking about. This is in general the music across the full spectrum. The moment u move about the sound fades.
 

elangoas

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Problem is, the moment I get up or walk about in the room, the sound goes dead or flat from a nice deep bass and mids that I get while Im sitting on the sofa. The sound quality just dips. Is there anything that can be done? Adding another two speakers is not an option.

Am guessing it is due to off-axis response of the speaker..

This is basically for music.

Do you feel the same with movies?
 

Hari Iyer

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This problem is associated with phase errors in the loudspeaker design. Once you set the phase accurate in your speakers, you get the same sound stage standing, sitting, on-axis or off-axis. The imaging is also accurate in most seating positions and sound stage is wide and deep.
 

efernand1

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Thanks ed but its not only the bass Im talking about. This is in general the music across the full spectrum. The moment u move about the sound fades.

Guess then thats why Bose markets their statement of Stereo music everywhere for their bookshelf speakers...and yes it is a fact....

Did you face this challenge when the 301s or Dalis or RTiA1s were connected?
 

kane

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This problem is associated with phase errors in the loudspeaker design. Once you set the phase accurate in your speakers, you get the same sound stage standing, sitting, on-axis or off-axis. The imaging is also accurate in most seating positions and sound stage is wide and deep.


How does one go about doing this ( NOOB Question) or is it rocket science.


Does the Filter screen Cloth etc affect this part.


Is there a moderate fix that can be done.
 
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Elango, movie and tv is on the mission, and normally when we watch movies we sit in one place and watch. But with music I tend to walk around a lil bit doing other stuff. But yes its the same for all the speakers I have and have had. Bose included. Maybe to a lesser extent.
 

Hari Iyer

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How does one go about doing this ( NOOB Question) or is it rocket science.


Does the Filter screen Cloth etc affect this part.


Is there a moderate fix that can be done.

The speaker grill and frame can alter the phase response of the speaker due to the edge interaction at mid frequency. Its better to have no grill or have them removed if possible during listening.

The fix cannot be piecemeal but holistic by simulating the cross-over, drivers and box and measure the impedance, phase and SPL level of the speakers. The step response, square wave response, impulse response, minimum phase, RT60, decay will show how well the speaker interacts with the room. The simulated response of the speaker can show, where exactly the filter phase changes and does that happen exactly at the crossover frequency. Also the low-pass and high-pass filter phase can show the individual/ relative phase difference between the filters. For a first order filter these need to be close to 90 degress and the resultant phase difference be ideally zero. The filter transfer function curve also shows how balanced the crossover network is in the pass band.

So to answer your question doing all this not easy fix for a diy unless you are ready to spend time, effort and money to do all these things.

Other things that can cause sound stage changes when sitting and standing are the interaction of the speakers with the room, vertical dispersion of the speaker and its interaction with floor and ceiling, off-axis response in the horizontal dispersion and how the early first reflections have been addressed overall in the room. Doing something in this area could also positively impact the sound stage for sure.
 
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kane

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The speaker grill and frame can alter the phase response of the speaker due to the edge interaction at mid frequency. Its better to have no grill or have them removed if possible during listening.

The fix cannot be piecemeal but holistic by simulating the cross-over, drivers and box and measure the impedance, phase and SPL level of the speakers. The step response, square wave response, impulse response, minimum phase, RT60, decay will show how well the speaker interacts with the room. The simulated response of the speaker can show, where exactly the filter phase changes and does that happen exactly at the crossover frequency. Also the low-pass and high-pass filter phase can show the individual/ relative phase difference between the filters. For a first order filter these need to be close to 90 degress and the resultant phase difference be ideally zero. The filter transfer function curve also shows how balanced the crossover network is in the pass band.

So to answer your question doing all this not easy fix for a diy unless you are ready to spend time, effort and money to do all these things.

Other things that can cause sound stage changes when sitting and standing are the interaction of the speakers with the room, vertical dispersion of the speaker and its interaction with floor and ceiling, off-axis response in the horizontal dispersion and how the early first reflections have been addressed overall in the room. Doing something in this area could also positively impact the sound stage for sure.


Thanks, though most of this went over my head. some of this is beginning to make sense. I am also beginning to believe that not all speakers can achieve this and hence the speaker placement etc play a huge role in trying to achieve a sweet spot rather than the whole room.
 

amit11

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Thanks ed but its not only the bass Im talking about. This is in general the music across the full spectrum. The moment u move about the sound fades.
I think moving away from the sweet spot, this is bound to happen in an audiophile setup.

This is not the case in consumer decks like sony / philips etc, and obviously they werent audiophile category. Never seen anybody listening to them sitting on a chair / sweet spot the way we listen to our hifi music system.

Sent from Note5
 

spirovious

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One thing can be done is that you can keep your speakers at each corner of your room(little tow in).Chance is that sound may not change to extreme level.
 

prem

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In any well set up system, the system should sound good anywhere in the room. I seldom sit in the sweet spot.
 

Hari Iyer

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Its important to have a good off-axis response to get a wider sweet spot every where in the room. This would call for some room treatment to address the early first reflections and some bass traps to address the room mode for booms. Some intelligent golden ratio placements can also help to reduce room anomalies if space permits.
 
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Got it. Mine is not an audiophile or properly setup system thats for sure. Thanks guys.
 

elangoas

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Mine is not an audiophile or properly setup system thats for sure.

Nope.. Your's is an audiophile & a properly set-up system..Shaping room acoustics is not every enthusiast cup of tea, which demands "What, When, Where" understanding & execution..
 

prem

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I dont think theres such a thing as audiophile system. Everybody buys a system to enjoy music:)

Every system, irrespective of price, needs to be well set up to maximise performance
 
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mpw

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audiophile is a term that is more often used to bash others who are more "specific / focussed " on their music and who often spend more money on their audio gear that was society considered normal or "simple"

OTOH - simple - is a word used to depict the opposite

Agree with prem - enjoi the setup and dont bash us poor audiophiles.

and by the way - nothing wrong in being an audiophile and why be ashamed of expressing so ?? ;)
 
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Because if I tell my wife Im an audiophile Ill be sleeping on the balcony, so I prefer to say Im a simple man with some free time and no other bad vices hehe
 
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