What next in audio technology?

Easy EMI Options at HiFiMART.com

jagadishareddy

New Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2009
Messages
108
Points
0
Location
doddakannahalli bangalore
Friends,

We know that we have htib's with 2.1s, 5.1s, 6.1s and 7.1s may be 6.2s and 7.2s.

We have THX Integrated System.

Now my qustion is what next?

And what is thx in the htib's? Is it better than 7.1?
 

gobble

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2008
Messages
5,342
Points
113
Location
Bangalore
Dunno about technology but its time for humans to evolve and sprout two more ears to have a total of 4 . No Wait! one more large ear for low frequencies ... :lol:

Cheers
 

venkatcr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
7,167
Points
113
Location
Chennai
I would rather stick to pure 2 channel audio and the best thing that has happend is the new Linn DS Technology. Check it out on Linn - hi-fi, home theatre and multi-room systems.

FOLKS. A WARNING. THE FOLLOWING WORDS ARE WHAT I WOULD CALL SOME ATROCIOUS LOUD THINKING INTO THE FUTURE. OF COURSE, THERE IS SOME SENSE AND SCIENCE BUILT INTO WHAT I AM SAYING. I AM HOPING WE CAN HAVE SOME HEALTHY DISCUSSION ON THIS, MORE AS PEOPLE WHO CAN LOOK INTO AND DREAM THE FUTURE, RATHER THAN SOMEONE WHO PASSIONATELY SUPPORTS A BRAND OR TECHNOLOGY. I AM NOT TRYING TO BELITTLE ANYONE HERE. I AM JUST THINKING WHAT I WOULD DO AS A MUSIC/MOVIE LOVER OVER THE NEXT 3 YEARS WITHOUT LOSING TOO MUCH MONEY.

I was wondering what the DS technology is and realised that it is a music server/ streamer.

I am little curious and amused about all the hulla bulla people are making about music servers and music steamers. Let me explain.

In CD/DVD and TT, physical stability is important as there is mechanical component or process in reading the data.

A hard disk, which is what stores data on music servers, is a different matter all together. The basic nature of hardware and software has been built around the assumption that data flow will be unreliable. And since data can be precisely measured, software as well as two way communication have been built to ensure that the data that starts from Point 1 is identical to the data that reaches Point 2.

I strongly believe that upto the point where the data stays digital, a PC based system will deliver the same reliability and performance as any of these new highly touted music servers and streamers.

It a different point that some of these will remove the need for a PC as they combine storage and delivery. But since most of us have a PC or a laptop and computing is not something we are going to give up, it makes more sense to build around the storage and delivery mechanism we already have. In that sense streamers such as Squeezebox and the new models from Linksys and other companies are more elegant and inexpensive solutions. These can take a FLAC file and deliver it at Point 2 with the same reliability as any other solution on earth.

However elegant a solution is, I would rather maximise the investment I have already made. I have, for example, over 2 TB of HD space, three computers, a powerful wireless system all working 24/7. At any time, none of these will be using more than 30% of the capacity. Should I not maximise the redundant storage, computing and transmission system I already have? That is where I like the Squeezebox. It does not reinvent the wheel.

As flash drives gain capacity, the whole methodology will change. if you have a 100GB flash drive, you copy a week's song, plug it into your expensive music system and listen to your heart's content. No streaming, no loss of data, no moving parts, nothing. 64 GB drives are already available, and I am sure 100 GB drives are not far away. Some laptop manufacturers are looking at doing away with HD drives altogether as flash drives cross the 100GB mark. 100Gb will also give you three months of movies assuming you see 1 movie a day. That is a lot is it not?

In my mind a good DAC with USB, card reader, wired, and wireless connectivity will make more sense than all these. Audio manufacturers have to start collaborating with computer manufacturers. It will be sad if they work in isolation and ignore the billions of dollars of technology and trillions of dollars of equipment that is already in use. They must understand that they are more at threat than the computer industry. If an Asus can make a path breaking sound card with unheard of sound reproduction and SN ratios, the computer industry is well equipped to wipe out the audio playing equipment industry (read CD and DVD Players) completely.

For example I am building an expensive HTPC, and I just realised that all I have to do is add a Blu-Ray player and a HDMI connection and mount it on my HT rack. So bye bye Mr. Oppo and your Blu-Ray player. My AVR already does the upscaling, so what more fireworks can you provide?

Similary, if EAC has the offset of every CD player and can accurately rip a CD, why do I need a Cyrus 8, or a CA 740C? I will rip a CD as soon as I buy one and play WAV of FLAC files only. At around 2K max, I can simply throw away the CD player every year and replace it with a new one.

Welcome to the real future where Microsoft, Dell, Yamaha, and Linn combine to make a audio/video product for us.

Cheers
 
Last edited:

hemantwaghe

Banned
Joined
Sep 23, 2007
Messages
3,659
Points
0
Has anybody heard about HRx?

It might be what Venkat is looking for - very high resolution PC based music
-
( Orignal referance Hifi news ,uk - Nov 2008 Issue)

Information about Reference Recordings, "Prof" Keith O. Johnson and HDCD Recordings

Reference Recordings in the News

HRx DVD-R data discs contain exact, digit-for-digit copies of the original Reference Recordings 176.4 kHz / 24-bit digital masters. This is the ultimate in fidelity for two-channel sound: TRUE high-resolution audio, ready to load from DVD-R data discs onto your computer music server!

Best of Show award for Greatest Technological Breakthrough: Reference Recordings HRx ultra-high resolution (176.4/24) digital music format. (Alan Taffel: The Absolute Sound April/May 2008)

To play HRx, the files on the DVD-R data disc must be uploaded to a computer music server, which then will play the music files through your audio system. (You cannot play them on CD, DVD, or SACD players)


---------
Important Technical Information/FAQs

1. What is HRx? HRx is our trade name for high resolution audio WAV files on a DVD-R data disc. These files contain exact bit-for-bit copies of Reference Recordings master recordings. They are the ultimate in fidelity for two-channel sound!

2. Why did Reference Recordings decide to make HRx? We have a virtually unbroken history of making the finest possible high resolution recordings. We started with analog tape. We werent satisfied with early technology, 16 bit digital recordings, but soon began making HDCD (High Definition Compatible Digital) recordings, in which the process was co-designed by our own recording guru Keith O. Johnson. In the opinion of many, these are probably the best digital recordings ever. Currently we record at 176.4 kHz/ 24 bits, with HDCD, and that is what we put on our HRx discs. Like any quality recording company, we have long been frustrated by the limitations of consumer formats: LP, CD, SACD, DVD-A, etc. No one but our recording and mastering team could hear the full beauty of our recordings! ALL of the consumer formats downgraded the true sound of the master tapes, either because of the limitations of the format itself or of the playback equipment. Computer music playback is the new frontier, and we applaud the brave audiophiles who are its pioneers! The WAV files on HRx are exactly the same as our master recordings. As long as the playback system you use does not convert or corrupt the bits, they will sound as wonderful as our original masters. HRx Notes by Keith O. Johnson

2A. What playback system does Reference Recordings use and what are other some other technical set ups.

2B. What are the system requirements to play back HRx? Your computer or music server must be able to read DVD-R discs and must read WAV files. Your media player and sound card must be able to output 176.4 kHz, 24 bit audio files. You must have a large amount of hard drive storage space available. One HRx title can take up to 4.7 GB of space. You must have software to manage the music playback. One example is Media Monkey. To realize the fullest potential of these master recordings, we recommend using very high quality equipment with proper, low jitter re-clocking, feeding the best possible external DAC. We recommend consulting a computer music specialist to set up a system to play back HRx.

Looking for more information? Here is a site RR recommends: a forum and a resource for technical information about playing back high-resolution computer files: Computer Audiophile | High-End Audiophile Music Servers

2C. Does HRx work with Mac? Yes, although Reference Recordings has less experience with Mac systems so far. Please consult a computer music specialist. UPDATE MAY 27, 2008: We have successfully tested this Mac playback system and achieved bit for bit resolution with sound that was equal to our PC systems detailed above: Link to Mac playback system details.

2D. Using HRx with Windows Vista.

3. Will Reference Recordings stop making CDs? We make terrific CDs, and expect to continue to do so for years. They provide a very satisfying musical experience for the vast majority of music lovers and audiophiles.

4. Will Reference Recordings make all its titles on HRx? No, only selected titles will be released on HRx.

5. Why do you use DVD-R instead of offering downloads? The uncompressed WAV files are so large, that we felt most people would prefer a DVD-R. That way, you dont have hours of download time, plus you have a backup. Reference Recordings DOES offer downloads of our titles in various other resolutions: mp3s from many internet vendors, and CD quality (44.1 kHz) from our partners at HDtracks.com. We expect to have either 88.2/24 or 96/24 files available from Hdtracks.com in the next few months also.

6. What does HRx cost? Reference Recordings is selling HRx titles for $45 each. They are individually made, tested and packaged by our staff.

========================
 

venkatcr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
7,167
Points
113
Location
Chennai
Somebody across the seven seas seems to have heard me. Robert Harley of AV guide says that disk drives deliver better sound that CD Players. Why? Keeping everything else the same, 'the most likely explanation is that hard drives deliver a bitstream with greater timing precision (lower jitter). If the bits are the same, and the sound is different, the only thing left is jitter.'

And his conclusion? 'We will increasingly listen to music from hard-disk drives; its good news that their advantages dont come with a sonic penalty. Indeed, hard-disk drives actually deliver better sound than optical disc.'

Wow! No CD Players for me at all. EAC, you are going to overworked from now on !!

Please read this interesting article at Do Hard-Disk Drives Sound Better Than CD? | AV Guide

Cheers
 

anm

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Messages
5,705
Points
113
Location
New Delhi, India
what happens to a music signal once it has vibrated our ear drums?
Chip implants is the real future to hear music and broadcasts.

regards

Friends,

We know that we have htib's with 2.1s, 5.1s, 6.1s and 7.1s may be 6.2s and 7.2s.

We have THX Integrated System.

Now my qustion is what next?

And what is thx in the htib's? Is it better than 7.1?
 

grubyhalo

New Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2008
Messages
1,968
Points
0
Location
Depends...
Chip implants is the real future to hear music and broadcasts.

regards

If by this you mean that a chip would receive the auditory signals bypassing the ear and transmitting it directly to the brain, it would be by-passing the entire storage and retrieval chain. A sort of digital LSD, if you will.;) No more CD's, LP's expensive pre's, amps, tt's, dacs etc,. It would spell doom for the audiophile species as we know it and save a lot of people a lot of money :D

I just hope and pray that science does not evolve enough to replace other sensory organs with a chip in the head...
 

mohamednaseer

Active Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2008
Messages
84
Points
28
Location
Chennai
Hi,

There are some more music formats which are the highest quality.

DTS HD Master Audio
Dolby True HD

DTS HD master audio will give 18 mbps sound.
 

anm

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Messages
5,705
Points
113
Location
New Delhi, India
yes GH, I mean exactly that :)
Not just audio but maybe video as well. Just shut your mind to those signals while driving.
Chips would boast 2000 bit digital to electric impulse conversion :)

regards

If by this you mean that a chip would receive the auditory signals bypassing the ear and transmitting it directly to the brain, it would be by-passing the entire storage and retrieval chain. A sort of digital LSD, if you will.;) No more CD's, LP's expensive pre's, amps, tt's, dacs etc,. It would spell doom for the audiophile species as we know it and save a lot of people a lot of money :D

I just hope and pray that science does not evolve enough to replace other sensory organs with a chip in the head...
 

anm

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Messages
5,705
Points
113
Location
New Delhi, India
Venkat,
I saw a post from you which talks about setting up a music player using windows. Good read - I am not able to find it now. Also, is there any option using linux instead of windows for the same?

regards
 

boslo

New Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2009
Messages
1
Points
0
Location
Sihat
It would definately be something that bypasses our ears and vision to connect direct with the nerve system. That would give a more "direct" experience because ours ears and eyes are "coloring" the impression.

.Bs Audio player software
 

deba

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2009
Messages
1,121
Points
63
Location
Kolkata
As far as pure audio is concerned:

Minidisc came Minidisc gone
DAT came DAT gone
SACD & DVD Audio came - still there with limited success.
Cassette - very rarely used.
Open Reel - gone forever.
Vinyl - very limited use by audiophiles.

So its the standard 1982 CD Audio that is staying in the market.:yahoo:

Next many formats may come in A/V but how many will stay in the market is very difficult to say.The same goes for "Audio for Video"....its the standard Dolby Digital and DTS.
 
Top