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Whats difference between HD-READY and FULL-HD

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prasad_dudwaadkar

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Whats difference between HD-READY and FULL-HD LCD TV

My assumptions:

Scenario 1 - I dont need a Full HD and can do with a HD READY + a good AV receiver (which upscales the video)

Scenario 2 - I buy a FULL HD TV which i can directly hook up to HD player / Bluray player / DVD player and it still gives me full resolution
 

metalbandit

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I have one more question in addition to the questions raised by prasad. Can an HD Ready TV actually display images at resolutions of 1920 x 1080p which have been upscaled via a DVD player or AV receiver?

I am asking this since HD Ready TV's are specified to have a resolution of 1366 x 768. Also which is a better option, going for a DVD player with HD upscaling or an AV receiver with HD upscaling?
 
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venkatcr

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Whats difference between HD-READY and FULL-HD LCD TV

My assumptions:

Scenario 1 - I dont need a Full HD and can do with a HD READY + a good AV receiver (which upscales the video)

Scenario 2 - I buy a FULL HD TV which i can directly hook up to HD player / Bluray player / DVD player and it still gives me full resolution
A Full HD is a screen that has a native resolution of 1920x1080 pixles. This can accept and play images that have been scaled up to 1080 with progressive scanning. This is what is known as 1080p upscaling.

A HD Ready screen on the other hand has a native resolution of 1366x768 pixels and can display images with upto 720p resolutions. Though it will also accept a 1080p image, this will be down scaled to match the screen's parameters.

As has been mentioned elsewhere many times, a Full HD system will make sense only if you have a screen size of 42 inches or more. Less than that, a HD Ready system is more that ample.

Cheers
 

prasad_dudwaadkar

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Thanks Venkat but i have one more query.

So will the AV Receiver upscaling (to 1080p) feature be effective with the HD-READY (less than 42")
 

adder

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well in these images u can notice the difference of 720p and 1080p image on a sony 32inch FHD lcd KLV-32W400A .
 

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venkatcr

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I have one more question in addition to the questions raised by prasad. Can an HD Ready TV actually display images at resolutions of 1920 x 1080p which have been upscaled via a DVD player or AV receiver?

I am asking this since HD Ready TV's are specified to have a resolution of 1366 x 768. Also which is a better option, going for a DVD player with HD upscaling or an AV receiver with HD upscaling?
Thanks Venkat but i have one more query.

So will the AV Receiver upscaling (to 1080p) feature be effective with the HD-READY (less than 42")
If you do not have a TV or screen that has a native resolution of 1920x1080, you cannot display 1080p images on it even if the AVR does 1080p up scaling.

When you have a AVR that does 1080p up scaling and only a HR Ready TV, you have to set the AVR to upscale only up to 720p. If you set it for 1080i or 1080p upscaling, nothing may happen, excepting that some parts of the movie may get distorted as the TV screen will not be able to handle the incoming data. The TV will try to scale down the images to it's native resolution. If the AVR is sending data at 1080p and the TV is looking at displaying at 720p, there may be a conflict. It is best to ensure that the AVr and the TV are both talking at 720p.

Regarding the choice between the AVR or DVD player to be the upscaling engine, this can only be answered against specific models. For example the Onkyo 875 uses a Reon upscaling engine, one the best in the world. The Oppo 983 Advanced video processing featuring "VRS? by Anchor Bay" Technologies through two different processing chips.

In the case of the Onkyo, a decent DVD Player would do and you can route both the video and the sound through the AVR.

If you are using the Oppo 983, you can connect the DVD Player to the TV directly, and use the AVR just for sound processing. In this case, a simpler AVR that has decent sound processing engine would suffice.

Today most DVD Players and most AVRs (other than entry level ones) provide video upscaling, So you have to make your choice carefully looking carefully at the video processing capabilities of each unit.
 

spirovious

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A Full HD is a screen that has a native resolution of 1920x1080 pixles. This can accept and play images that have been scaled up to 1080 with progressive scanning. This is what is known as 1080p upscaling.

A HD Ready screen on the other hand has a native resolution of 1366x768 pixels and can display images with upto 720p resolutions. Though it will also accept a 1080p image, this will be down scaled to match the screen's parameters.

As has been mentioned elsewhere many times, a Full HD system will make sense only if you have a screen size of 42 inches or more. Less than that, a HD Ready system is more that ample.

Cheers
Hi,

According to me 32 in LCDs are out with Full HD logo.So do you think they

are not actual Full HD?
 

spirovious

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One more thing,do we always need DVD player with upscaling feature to
1080p to get HD image or ordinary DVD player(not blueray) with HDMI out
when connected to Full HD will automaticaly show it?

If you do not have a TV or screen that has a native resolution of 1920x1080, you cannot display 1080p images on it even if the AVR does 1080p up scaling.

When you have a AVR that does 1080p up scaling and only a HR Ready TV, you have to set the AVR to upscale only up to 720p. If you set it for 1080i or 1080p upscaling, nothing may happen, excepting that some parts of the movie may get distorted as the TV screen will not be able to handle the incoming data. The TV will try to scale down the images to it's native resolution. If the AVR is sending data at 1080p and the TV is looking at displaying at 720p, there may be a conflict. It is best to ensure that the AVr and the TV are both talking at 720p.

Regarding the choice between the AVR or DVD player to be the upscaling engine, this can only be answered against specific models. For example the Onkyo 875 uses a Reon upscaling engine, one the best in the world. The Oppo 983 Advanced video processing featuring "VRS? by Anchor Bay" Technologies through two different processing chips.

In the case of the Onkyo, a decent DVD Player would do and you can route both the video and the sound through the AVR.

If you are using the Oppo 983, you can connect the DVD Player to the TV directly, and use the AVR just for sound processing. In this case, a simpler AVR that has decent sound processing engine would suffice.

Today most DVD Players and most AVRs (other than entry level ones) provide video upscaling, So you have to make your choice carefully looking carefully at the video processing capabilities of each unit.
 

venkatcr

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According to me 32 in LCDs are out with Full HD logo.So do you think they are not actual Full HD?
Spirovious, any TV that has a native resolution of 1920x1080 pixles and can accept and play images that have been scaled up to 1080 with progressive scanning is a Full HD TV.

To fully understand the implications of high resolution and high definition vs size, we must first understand something called acuity of vision. The Dictionary of Visual Science defines visual acuity as "acuteness or clearness of vision, especially form vision, which is dependent on the sharpness of the retinal focus within the eye, the sensitivity of the nervous elements, and the interpretative faculty of the brain." What this means is our eyes have a resolution limit. Increased image resolution is simply an technical exercise, beyond our ability to see it, and does not play any part in improving the viewing experience. Our visual acuity is unambiguous and relatively simple to measure.

The most common vision measuring tool is called the Snellen chart. An optometrist will ask you to read from a chart standing 20 feet (or six meters) away from it. The smallets number you can read defines your acuity of vision. This is expressed as a fraction. A normal vision is supposed to be 20/20. 20/10 means that a subject can read, from a distance of twenty feet, the line that a subject with "normal" vision could only read from ten feet. 20/10 vision is therefore twice as good as 20/20. In comparison, 20/40 is twice as bad.

Coming to video display, the human eye??s resolution (acuity) is directly proportional to the size of the elements of the image and inversely proportional to distance from the elements. This relationship is best expressed in degrees.

In simple terms, we can see things that exist within a known angle with the apex being our nose. If you stare straight ahead, you will have a stereoscopic field of view of about 100 degrees, or about 50 degress to the left and right of your nose. We also have a lower limit to our field of view. Scientists express this as an angle as well, but it is less than a degree, and is expressed differently, For angles smaller than 1 degree we use arcminutes and arcseconds as a measurement. An arcminute is equal to one sixtieth (1/60) of one degree. "Normal" visual acuity is considered to be the ability to recognize an optotype (letter on the Snellen chart) when it goes down to 5 minutes of arc. Taking this to displays, the average person cannot see more than two pixels separated by less than 2 arcminutes of angle.

A 42 inch screen is the minimum size, where the pixels are seperated by 2 arcminutes of angle, if you sit some 6 feet away from it. In smaller screens, the pixels are closer. Though they can also display images with 1080p resolutions, the eye will not be able to appreciate that as compared to say 720p even if you sit very near the screen. Both will look the same.

One more thing,do we always need DVD player with upscaling feature to 1080p to get HD image or ordinary DVD player(not blueray) with HDMI out when connected to Full HD will automaticaly show it?
To get 1080p on the screen you have to upscale data from a regular DVD media. This is called a Standard Definition DVD (SD DVD), by the way. The upscaling can be done by either the DVD player or the AVR. If you have an ordinary DVD player and have a AVR that upscales, it will accept the image through it's component video (or HDMI in some cases) and upscale to 1080p. If you have a DVD player that upscales, and an AVR that does not, you can connect that directly to the TV with a separate connection to the AVR for sound.

What if both have upscaling features? Here you have two options.

(1) Most AVRs have a feature called pass-through. In other words, the AVR will transfer the upscaled vidoe images from the DVD player directly to the TV without any processing.You should use HDMI in this case.
(2) You can connect the DVD player to the AVR with a component video cable and allow the AVR to do the upscaling. The AVR will be connected to the TV through an HDMI.

It is in this situation that you have to switch between the upscaling capabilities of the AVR and DVD player to see which you like and use that method.
 

venkatcr

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What is difference b/w 1080i and 1080p ?
Santosh, this actually needs a very detailed explanation. I am writing an article that I will publish soon. In the meantime, here is a quick explanation.

The 'i' after the 1080 refers to Interlaced, while 'p' refers to Progressive. Both are methods to display an image on a TV display.

The film that you see in a movies hall consists of a reel of still pictures. Each picture is called a frame. Each successive frame differs from the previous frame in small way. For example, if a man is walking, the first frame will display an image of the man in the starting position. The second frame will display the mans image with the legs and hands in a slightly different position. When all these frames are shown quickly one after the other, you eye perceives the still pictures as motion. This method of moving the still frames one after the other is termed as Frames Per Second or fps.

The human eye can perceive motion at 16 fps, but Hollywood, for various historical reasons, had adopted 24 fps as the standard frame rate for all movies.

In a film that you see in a movie hall, each still picture fills the entire frame. This is called progressive source. This means that the frame rate is the number of individual full pictures. In the came of film this is exactly 24,

INTERLACED

In the initial days of TV, there was no way to display a full frame on a Cathode Ray Tube or CRT screen, This is an analogue device. In all CRT monitors, the image is painted on the screen by an electron beam that scans from one side of the display to the other drawing thin lines. This scan is used to display the transitions in color, intensity and pattern, and each complete pass of the electron gun is called a FIELD. A field will consist of 'n' number of scanned lines. Analogue TV uses a process that relies on the brain's ability to integrate gradual transitions in pattern that the eye sees as the image is painted on the screen. Each picture or frame on a television screen is composed of 525 lines, numbered from 1 to 525. During the first phase of screen drawing, even-numbered lines are drawn - 2,4,6,8 and so on. During the next phase, the odd lines are drawn 1,3,5,7 and so on. The eye integrates the two images to create a single image. See picture below. The fields are said to be interleaved together or interlaced. A frame or complete picture consists of two fields. Like with film, each picture is from a different moment in time. Unlike film, the rate of individual pictures, or fields, is twice the frame rate.



Though modern television are not made this way any more, and modern LCD and Plasma TVs can display a full frame, remember the TV production and broadcast systems have been designed around the FIELD concept and is entrenched around the world.

There are two dominant interlaced scan systems used in the world today - NTSC and PAL.

NTSC is based on a 525-line, 60 fields/30 frames-per-second at 60Hz system for transmission and display. . This is an interlaced system in which each frame is scanned in two fields of 262 lines each, which is then combined to display a frame of video with 525 scan lines. NTSC is used in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, some parts of Central and South America, Japan, Taiwan, and Korea.

PAL is based on a 625 line, 50 field/25 frames a second, 50HZ system. The signal is interlaced, like NTSC, into two fields, composed of 312 lines each. PAL is used in the U.K., Germany, Spain, Portugal, Italy, China, India, most of Africa, and the Middle East.

PROGRESSIVE SCANNING

In progressive scan the image is displayed on a screen by scanning each line (or row of pixels) in a sequential order. In other words, in progressive scan, the image lines are scanned in numerical order (1,2,3) down the screen from top to bottom, In NTSC for example, by progressively scanning the image onto a screen every 60th of a second rather than "interlacing" alternate lines every 30th of a second, a smoother, more detailed, image can be produced on the screen,

While film only has progressive frames, and analog video only interlaced fields, digital video may have either or both. In the digital domain, displaying progressively is a property separate from the contents of the frame. Although it's possible to encode and store interlaced video as a stream of fields, most interlaced video is encoded in pairs in the form of frames. As a rule, frame based interlaced encoding is less efficient than progressive encoding. This means that files with comparable bit rates will have lower quality if they contain interlaced video.

Cheers
 
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santosh titus

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Venkat, Thanks for taking time for giving replies to my queries.

For Onkyo tsxr606 which I've shortlisted the video scaling specification given is 720p/1080i.

I'm planning to have a Sony KLV-32W400A , Full HD 1080 for display.

A comparitive study with denon avr 1909 shows a video scaling of 1080p.

As explained in ur reply the methodology for display is different in both the cases, what impact it will have on the viewership quality with the above configuration i've shortlisted, will it be the same and cannot be differentiated or sutle difference might be there?

I've read in one of the reviews that tsxr 606 will allow the 1080p signal to pass thru or player can be connected directly to the tv and avr can be used for the audio. pls comment.
 

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Santosh, before Venkat gives you a proper well-informed reply, let me throw in my not so well-informed two cents.

Firstly, at 32 inches you will struggle to differentiate between 1080i and 1080p or 720p and 1080p, even if we're talking about native HD signals. Venkat has a lovely post in this thread where he explains the reasons for this including the acuity of vision. There is also an interesting CNET article on the topic.

Secondly, upscaling is just...well.....pseudo-HD.....it's an attempt to using some mathematics.....to convert an SD image into an HD image.

Thirdly, your display will upscale all signals that it receives to 1080p.

With these three factors in mind, I very seriously doubt you'll miss 1080p upscaling on your AVR. Now even if you're an exceptional person who will be able discern some difference, the 1080p pass-through on the 606, or directly connecing your source to your display, should take care of the issue.

So, in my personal view the buying decision for AVRs shouldn't be based on this factor alone. If anything, you can use this as a tie-breaker in case both units come up level in your estimation for your use.
 

santosh titus

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Thanks

Your point on 32 " is well noted, 40" are expensive 1.19 lacs.

Either I should increase my budget which is already stretched or I'll have to wait for the prices to come down.

Thanks once again.

Santosh
 

psychotropic

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Santosh, unless Full HD is a must-have, you could maybe consider what I'm doing.....ie going for Plasma.....42" Samsung 410 at 55.5k, Samsung 450 at 61k (or less), Panasonic PV8H for about 65k, are the bottom end of the good options, with presumably more quality as you go up the price-scale. I did consider spending similar amounts on a Full HD 37 inch (Samsung 5 series), but the wow-factor of 42 inches of screen real estate is really nice :)

If you'd rather stick to 32" then I do think you can consider dumping Full HD and using that extra money for some other part of your setup.....yes, the 32W400 is a lovely TV set, and you probably won't regret buying it, but 60k is a fair bit of money to spend on a 32 incher these days.


Thanks

Your point on 32 " is well noted, 40" are expensive 1.19 lacs.

Either I should increase my budget which is already stretched or I'll have to wait for the prices to come down.

Thanks once again.

Santosh
 

nileshvalvekar

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Hello....People....
I have decided to go for 32inch samsung LED Tv ...But I am confused with samsung 32 Eh 4000 and samsung 32 Eh 4800.. Please help me out. Or else you can suggest me some other models also...Thank U & Waiting for your reply
 

Sudeep

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One more factor when choosing a full HD is of course whether the content is HD as well. I have a 42 inch full HD Sony Bravia and all SD channels on Tata Sky look awful on the HD display. So in that regard, going for a 32 inch might indeed be a better choice
 
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