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Are you a music lover or an audiophile?

soundbuff

Active Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2015
Messages
287
Points
43
Location
Bangalore
I honestly cannot listen to music that is poorly reproduced or broadcast. Recently I had gone to a friend's housewarming in a small town in Karnataka. Later, we found that a famous Yashagana troupe was performing in a village temple not too far away. We drove through for an hour through pitch darkness to reach there. The Yakshagana performance was superb. Some Seth from Mumbai was hosting it. It should have been a lovely open air concert. However the sound was absolutely un-bearable: unrealistically loud, horribly distorted and harsh as hell. I sat through it for half and hour, then left the place went to my car and locked myself in to avoid the pain. A lovely performance destroyed by the electronics and more importantly a poor understanding of public broadcasting. My friends however sat through it for another hour or more, although they agreed that it was too loud. Seems our thresholds are quite different. Whether that makes me less of a music lover I don't really know.
 
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Fiftyfifty

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2016
Messages
592
Points
63
Location
Pune
I'm so glad i started this thread and I'm thankful for all the responses. They've made me dig into the inner chambers of my music library and pull out some gems that i had archived on my journey down the rabbit hole. And I hope others have been encouraged to do that too :) :) :). There are some great artistes whose work was never ever well recorded!
 

superczar

Active Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2008
Messages
158
Points
28
I honestly cannot listen to music that is poorly reproduced or broadcast. Recently I had gone to a friend's housewarming in a small town in Karnataka. Later, we found that a famous Yashagana troupe was performing in a village temple not too far away. We drove through for an hour through pitch darkness to reach there. The Yakshagana performance was superb. Some Seth from Mumbai was hosting it. It should have been a lovely open air concert. However the sound was absolutely un-bearable: unrealistically loud, horribly distorted and harsh as hell. I sat through it for half and hour, then left the place went to my car and locked myself in to avoid the pain. A lovely performance destroyed by the electronics and more importantly a poor understanding of public broadcasting. My friends however sat through it for another hour or more, although they agreed that it was too loud. Seems our thresholds are quite different. Whether that makes me less of a music lover I don't really know.
That seems to be an extreme case - but sadly quite often seen at public gatherings where a desire for high SPL trumps everything else.
I think the OPs question has more to do with a comparison between a OK setup for convenient listening (e.g. Airpods or say the kitchen setup in my sig) vs a critical listening session and setup
 

Fantastic

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2010
Messages
827
Points
63
Location
Third Rock
For me it depends on the type of music and how I'm listening to it. Like if it's playing in the background while I'm busy doing something else it doesn't matter how good the recording is. Especially if they are old recordings. Old recordings that I really like very much in any case sound good even if the recording is not up to the mark. But if I'm sitting down in my faviourite chair and listening to the music seriously then I'd play well recorded music. Maybe like good jazz or new age music or actually anything that I like but is very well recorded. I usually play an album all the way through without skipping tracks. On many occasions tracks I didn't care for much , later turned out to be quite nice after listening to them many times ! So I think only when I play music with my undivided attention to the playback , the recording has to be very good . Otherwise it doesn't matter much, which actually happens more often than not .
 

Mi_10

Active Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2018
Messages
97
Points
33
Location
Chennai
I used to study my boards playing a Philips 2 in 1 besides me.l used to concentrate more with music playing in background than studying at quiet room.
You are the third person in my life who have said this exact statement. Using Music as a medium of organized distraction so that you can concentrate more on something else - most likely studying.
The First time i heard was when i was in my 10th and my tution teacher used to prepare for her CAT / GMAT exams! She used to hearing to music makes her mind consolidate all distractions into just one. Apparently one distraction is easier to handle than multiple thoughts if not for the music !

The Second was when i was doing my Engineering, one of my class mates used to study with a earphone plugged in to to his Walkman!

Honestly, if i were to hear music, then everything else takes a backseat! ; Foreground or background doesn't matter :(
 

amitk777

Active Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2010
Messages
174
Points
28
Location
Hyderabad
I have the following explanation based on left and right brain theory.:p

a) When listening critically, one is in analysis mode. This cannot be a relaxing situation and cannot result in enjoyment. One is listening to soundstage, channel separation whatever - lot of analysis is going on . It is like giving a Physics exam. Now , reviewers need to do this to report out on equipment, but not the listeners.
b) When listening casually, there is little analysis. There is relaxation and possibly a more holistic view of the experience. Overall stress comes down and one is in harmony with the music.

Situation a) is not going to lead to much satisfaction, like two parallel lines who are never going to meet.

Situation b) will always be satisfying. I usually sit away from the "sweet spot" to prevent myself getting into mode a) .
 

Vinay2013

Active Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2013
Messages
429
Points
43
Location
Gurgaon
I used to listen via walkman and earphones hung in the wall during late night studies for CA and I still remember those days of pure bliss.
I used to enjoy AR Rahman songs in cassette decks with 8" woofer and 4" tweeter speaker boxes with enahanced bass and treble and was very happy. Somehow not able to enjoy them like that now in more sophisticated systems.
I was listening to Jagjit Singh's Ghazals in cassettes because recordings were awesome.
I sold my Marantz Amp and Monitor Audio speakers because I was always looking for something more during critical listening.
I have installed very basic speakers in my balcony which is run by a cheap SMSL bluetooth amp. Most relaxing experience when i sit in my balcony with a cup of tea or drink and listen.
I don't have any dedicated stereo music setup now for critical listening. Just using my home theater and other speakers in balcony and a bose soundtouch mini. surprisingly Bose has more details in comparison with other expensive systems. Perhaps i don't expect much from them and they exceeded expectations.
In short, I have stopped trying to hear things which may or may not be there and just enjoying the music. I am obviously a music lover and not an audiophile.
 

firearm12

Active Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2014
Messages
345
Points
43
Location
noida
I sold my Marantz Amp and Monitor Audio speakers because I was always looking for something more during critical listening.
I have also realised its too easy go into this kind of mode where there is no satisfaction. Is it sounding good or not is always the question in the mind and it robs off all the pleasure from all the music. How to get out of this mode is currently i am struggling with. So audiophile journey which starts with love for music, then gradually music takes backspace, sound takes priority and then one day we realise that we need to love music again, not sound.
 
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