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Buy speakers which will best suit for the Amplifier ?

Wharfedale Diamond 11 Series
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Hello All,

I am New to this Forum.
I have a question: what thumb rule I should follow while I buy Speaker(s) those will match AV Receiver (AVR) power output.

For example:
My AVR output is 120w/channel (6 ohms, 1KHz, 1% THD, Channel driven, JEITA.

AVR Model: Onkyo Tx-SR343.

Should I buy speaker whose RMS power will be
> 120 Watts (or)
= 120 Watts (or)
<120 Watts

Will it harmfull to Speaker or AVR if I hook >120 watt speaker or <120 watt speaker to this Onkyo AVR unit?

Thanks for your reply.
Deva.
 

Ananth.albums

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Feb 4, 2016
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Hi All,

Greetings!!

I have bought Philips HTB 5520/94 Bluray Home theater which supports DTS Master HD Dolby Digital, just wanted to know if i need to buy av receiver. If required what difference will it make. Is there any av receiver supports THX and are there any movies recently with THX technology.

Your support is highly appreciated.

Regards,
Anantha
 

krishnamurthy

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Logic says you buy speakers which take less power than what the AVR can provide, otherwise the speakers output may not be appropriate to your ears.
 

raghupb

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SR343 is a 65W amp at 8 ohm 2 ch driven 20-20khz. You can go for 100W 8 ohm speakers.
Look for above 90dB SPL rating, if budget allows.
 
Last edited:

Srinath_seshadri

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Logic says you buy speakers which take less power than what the AVR can provide, otherwise the speakers output may not be appropriate to your ears.

This is correct.
You don't want to run the amp WFO - and its better to send the speaker to its limit without taxing the amp. Speaker clipping = you hear it and turn it down before it does damage. Amp clipping = you burn the amp.
Cool.
Srinath.
 

MaSh

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Bangalore
Hello All,

I am New to this Forum.
I have a question: what thumb rule I should follow while I buy Speaker(s) those will match AV Receiver (AVR) power output.

For example:
My AVR output is 120w/channel (6 ohms, 1KHz, 1% THD, Channel driven, JEITA.

AVR Model: Onkyo Tx-SR343.

Should I buy speaker whose RMS power will be
> 120 Watts (or)
= 120 Watts (or)
<120 Watts

Will it harmfull to Speaker or AVR if I hook >120 watt speaker or <120 watt speaker to this Onkyo AVR unit?

Thanks for your reply.
Deva.

I guess you have already got your answer in the above posts which are all true. How loud are you going to be playing your music/movie? If really loud then match the power of amp and speaker. If you are going to play at moderate levels, then instead of wattage, match the Ohm rating on the amp and speaker. Most modern amps accept 6-16 Ohm or so rating. This is important, as you dont want the ohm rating to be unmatched. Long story short, any speaker of 8Ohms should do just fine. What matters is that it should sound good to you. So go audition all the speakers, mention the name of the amp to the sales representative and pick the speakers that sound best to you.

FYI, I am running a Marantz receiver rated at 50w per channel with Polk speakers rated at 8Ohm|89db and can handle 20-150w, with no issues at all.

MaSh
 
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SR343 is a 65W amp at 8 ohm 2 ch driven 20-20khz. You can go for 100W 8 ohm speakers.
Look for above 90dB SPL rating, if budget allows.

------------
From this forum I come to know that Speaker's RMS power should be slight less (about 10%) than the AVR power.

Do you agree?

You said this AVR is a 65W amp at 8 ohms 2 channel driven.
Then the speaker should be less than AVR. Isn't it ?

But you are saying to get 100W 8 Ohms speaker for 65W AVR !

There is some confusion.
-------------
 

krishnamurthy

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Amp supplies power, so speakers take only what is required to play a certain track/sequence and that too what they are designed for.
 

raghupb

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------------
From this forum I come to know that Speaker's RMS power should be slight less (about 10%) than the AVR power.

Do you agree?

You said this AVR is a 65W amp at 8 ohms 2 channel driven.
Then the speaker should be less than AVR. Isn't it ?

But you are saying to get 100W 8 Ohms speaker for 65W AVR !

There is some confusion.
-------------

100W is the max rating. Typically speakers come alive with 10-20 watts of power depending on their sensitivity (SPL). And then some more to sound good. These days even budget speakers can handle 100W, hence the guidance.
My AVR is 50W, IA is 70W, amps are 200W. All can drive my speakers rated 15-120W.
Don't worry too much. Just make sure they're nominal 8 ohm.
Tomorrow if you buy a different AVR/amp they will still hold up.
Cheers,
Raghu
 
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100W is the max rating. Typically speakers come alive with 10-20 watts of power depending on their sensitivity (SPL). And then some more to sound good. These days even budget speakers can handle 100W, hence the guidance.
My AVR is 50W, IA is 70W, amps are 200W. All can drive my speakers rated 15-120W.
Don't worry too much. Just make sure they're nominal 8 ohm.
Tomorrow if you buy a different AVR/amp they will still hold up.
Cheers,
Raghu

======================
Hello Again Mr. Raghu,

In this forum everyone is talking about 8 Ohms speakers but those speakers I am looking to buy have give their specs as 6 Ohms.

https://pioneer-india.in/product/sp-1135vs/
https://pioneer-india.in/product/sp-1135ts/

The specs says:
Normal Impedance-6 Ohms
Permissible Max input: 150W

Question is:
What 6 Ohms speakers are not good ?
I know Lower the impedance lower the power (i=v/R).
So, lower speaker impedance (8 Ohms) is the better sound quality ?
=================
 

Rajkumars

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If speaker is rated less wattage than AVR then ....

During use you don't know how much wattage/power you are sending to speaker ..... So unknowingly you may send more power to it which will result in burning of the speaker coil.....

So for the sake of safety of the speakers it is better(not mandatory) to buy higher wattage speakers than AVR ..... Then you never have to worry about the speakers anymore ...... They will run long .... Very long ......even perm anent if handled carefully ......

Buy higher wattage speakers you can afford ...... To be future proof ..... and tension free about turning up the volume ......

It is like a balloon ... More air pressure will blow it
 
Last edited:
Joined
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If speaker is rated less wattage than AVR then ....

During use you don't know how much wattage/power you are sending to speaker ..... So unknowingly you may send more power to it which will result in burning of the speaker coil.....

So for the sake of safety of the speakers it is better(not mandatory) to buy higher wattage speakers than AVR ..... Then you never have to worry about the speakers anymore ...... They will run long .... Very long ......even perm anent if handled carefully ......

Buy higher wattage speakers you can afford ...... To be future proof ..... and tension free about turning up the volume ......

It is like a balloon ... More air pressure will blow it

===============
Hi Raj,
If I take higher ratted Speaker then won't it cause overload to the Source AVR. AVR will continue more heated-up and one day it will burnt out !

Like an example: A Home UPS which can supply Max 100 watt and I connect a Load of 150W. UPS can't source how much the load demanded.

This example can be for a amplifier & a higher ratted Speaker, isn't it ?
=-=================
 

raghupb

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X watts - this number is related to max power the speaker can handle, beyond which damage can occur
Y db SPL - this number is related to potentially how loud the speaker can sound
Z Ohms - this number is related to how much current it may demand from the amp's power supply

Just because a speaker is rated 100W does not mean it is going to be running at 100W when plugged in to an amp.
100W is a lot of power and can sound very dangerously loud on say 90dB speakers.
You can have short/long term hearing loss when listening at these levels even for 5-10 mins.

Check the replies to your other thread
http://www.hifivision.com/speakers/62065-6-ohms-8-ohms-speakers-one-better-choice.html

Regarding the Pioneer packages, they are 6-ohm nominal but they don't spec the min.
Since they are HT speakers the AVR, with bass management, will send low frequencies (ones that usually demand higher current) to the sub.
So the satellites in the package will behave reasonably and present 6 ohm or higher impedance. The AVR will not complain.

About how they sound? Your ears and you the best judge. Hear them out and decide.

Cheers,
Raghu
 

jls001

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You're worrying too much about the peak power ratings. You will never drive your amplifiers at their peak rated output. By the time you drive them to even 60-70% of the rated peak power, you will hear unacceptable distortion in the sound. Remember, the distortion figures are cleverly specified for a 1 kHz signal at 1 Watt of power. No OEM will tell you what the corresponding figures are at higher power or at different frequencies.

Also, consider a real life situation. Most people listen to music at about 85 dB SPL. Let's assume that your speakers can produce a loudness of 85 dB heard at one metre distance from speaker when fed a one Watt signal. Most people won't be listening at 1m distance. For the sake of our explanation, let's assume most folks are happily enjoying their music sitting 2m away from the speakers. So to achieve the same 85 dB SPL loudness, the amp will have to feed it four times the power needed at 1m. So 4 watts. Now let's say 85 is a bit low so let's double the power to 8 watts. SPL will now be 88 dB. This is the average loudness. Music will have peaks - say as much as +20 dB from average in extreme cases. Even if you add for such peaks, you'll be using just a fraction of the 100 watts of your amplifier.

So short answer: even a (true) 50 Watt amplifier will be more than enough to give you extremely loud music in most listening rooms.

Whatever combination of amplifier-speakers you buy, take care not to drive them to clipping levels.

Do go to as many audio showrooms that you can go and listen, listen and listen to different offerings. That way, you'll be able to sieve the crappy ones from the good ones, and further refine that to the best sounding. All within your budget of course. Take CDs of familiar music, don't depend on CDs that may be available at the showroom - they might not be familiar to you. It's essential to listen to familiar music as that's the only benchmark you have and can carry around in your memory. Listen to how they sound in different setups.

Don't ask the showroom guys for the specs. Listen first. It matters more. You can be sure that they'll not sell you incompatible amp-speakers that will burn out at the first opportunity.

Also, ignore temporarily the prices, as we tend to automatically assume higher priced offerings should sound better. This isn't always borne out in listenings.

Happy hunting:)
 
Last edited:

Rajkumars

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===============
Hi Raj,
If I take higher ratted Speaker then won't it cause overload to the Source AVR. AVR will continue more heated-up and one day it will burnt out !

Like an example: A Home UPS which can supply Max 100 watt and I connect a Load of 150W. UPS can't source how much the load demanded.

This example can be for a amplifier & a higher ratted Speaker, isn't it ?
=-=================
OMG!!!

Let me tell you in simple words ....

A 300W fridge will always draw 300W power ,which we can't control it normally .....

Where as 10000W speaker will draw 10000W power only if we provide it from 100W AVR , but it can't go beyond 100W ..... We can control the power send to the speakers ..... Its in our hands ..... At low volumes we will be sending 10-20W to the speaker ..... At max we can send 100W power from 100w AVR .....

If we use 50W speaker .....and if we send 40W power nothing will happen to both speaker and AVR .... But if we send more than 50W power say 60W ....the speaker will blow ...... Nothing will happen to AVR .....

You can safely connect a 100000W speaker to 100 W AVR ....

AVR won't burn in any case .....unless you overheat it or use max power from it ..... Its in your hands .... But not in speakers hands.....
 

raghupb

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Hi All,

Greetings!!

I have bought Philips HTB 5520/94 Bluray Home theater which supports DTS Master HD Dolby Digital, just wanted to know if i need to buy av receiver. If required what difference will it make. Is there any av receiver supports THX and are there any movies recently with THX technology.

Your support is highly appreciated.

Regards,
Anantha

@Anantha

Philips HTB 5520/94 Bluray Home theater, is a complete solution with AVR and speakers. No you would not have to invest in another AVR.

THX is not a format like Dolby/DTS, it is a certification about how loud sound should be at listening seat for an immersive experience.
Keep in mind the numbers for THX are different for real theaters and home theaters.

For now you need to ruthlessly enjoy the current HT and spend money on a bluray player (if you don't have one) and bluray content.
When the upgrade bug bites you (say in 3-5 years) you can start thinking about AVRs which would have evolved to include many more features/formats.

Cheers,
Raghu
 
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