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AV Cables

mandeep

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Dec 8, 2007
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(1)what is the definition for "LARGE" and "small" floorstanders........is it the size of speakers or the power it can handle or both...............

(2) what is the best setting for "Dynamic range"...max/std/min.....(for yamaha amp) and why?

(3) what is the best setting for "bass"....main/both/swfr....(for yamaha amp) and why?
 

unleash_me

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Oct 1, 2007
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Nostalgia
(1)what is the definition for "LARGE" and "small" floorstanders........is it the size of speakers or the power it can handle or both...............
QUOTE]

If the speaker can go all the way down to 20Hz or below, you can consider them large. If they can comfortably handle only up to 60-100Hz, then it should be selected as Small.

For HT setup, irrespective of the physical attributes of the speakers, it is advisable to set them as "small" and the crossover to 80Hz. If you are sure that your floorstands can handle better bass, you may further reduce it to 60Hz also depending on how good the Sub is and how well it is seamlessly integrated with the rest of the set up.

For HiFi, its better to set the floorstands as Large.

Best Regards.
 

particleman

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May 11, 2007
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To address points 2 & 3:

Dynamic Range refers ONLY to the output volume of a Dolby Digital AC3 signal as it is ignored by all others. Full dynamic range is as the name implies the entire frequency range, low bass rumbles and ear-shattering highs included. As you decrease dynamic range, you diminish high volumes at either extreme and so explosions are softer but dialogue always remains the same. In other words, you are controlling the range of volume during playback. If you are listening late at night or do not wish to be startled by sudden, loud sounds you can set the DRC to std or even min. Since decreasing the dynamic range also increases the apparent "loudness" of softer sounds (bringing them out of the shadows, so to speak) it is also useful if you think your setup/speakers need a little help.

Bass redirection deals with whether low-frequency sound (usually 80/90Hz and lower) is sent exclusively to the front speakers alone, subwoofer alone, or both front speakers and subwoofer. If you use a sub with satellites or bookshelf speakers with limited dynamic range then you would set this to "Subwoofer" and let it handle the low-frequency sound. No point in sending a signal to speakers that they cannot handle. If you do not have a sub and have floorstanding speakers you would choose to send to "Main", i.e. fronts (no choice!). Finally if you have floorstanders AND a sub, you can send the signal to both. This is especially useful if your avr does not allow you to set the sub crossover frequency. You can then set it on the sub instead so that there is a suitable overlap with the floorstanders.
 

pnredkar

New Member
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Dec 6, 2007
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Bangalore
To address points 2 & 3:
Dynamic Range refers ONLY to the output volume of a Dolby Digital AC3 signal as it is ignored by all others. Full dynamic range is as the name implies the entire frequency range, low bass rumbles and ear-shattering highs included. As you decrease dynamic range, you diminish high volumes at either extreme and so explosions are softer but dialogue always remains the same. In other words, you are controlling the range of volume during playback. If you are listening late at night or do not wish to be startled by sudden, loud sounds you can set the DRC to std or even min. Since decreasing the dynamic range also increases the apparent "loudness" of softer sounds (bringing them out of the shadows, so to speak) it is also useful if you think your setup/speakers need a little help.

I thought that the dynamic range applies to ALL frequencies. So, if you have dialogs which contains mix of very low (whispering) and very high (shouting) volumes which exceed the specified dynamic range, then compression (DRC) will be applied. Movies followed by ads on TV is a situation which comes to mind. The explosions stuff is where DRC is most commonly applied and hence always serve as an example.

That was my understanding. I may be wrong, however.

Regards,
Prasad Redkar.
 

particleman

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You are right. That is what I meant to say but I guess I did not express myself correctly. DRC will limit the "gamut" (to borrow an imaging term) of sound, raising the extreme lows and softening the extreme highs -- pushing either ends closer to the middle, which remains constant. Thus allowing soft sounds to be heard more easily, loud explosions to be softened a bit, and thus diminishing extreme variation in volume.
 

Srinath_Murthy

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Jan 24, 2008
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Mumbai
(1)what is the definition for "LARGE" and "small" floorstanders........is it the size of speakers or the power it can handle or both...............

(2) what is the best setting for "Dynamic range"...max/std/min.....(for yamaha amp) and why?

(3) what is the best setting for "bass"....main/both/swfr....(for yamaha amp) and why?

Mandeep, In my experience, there is a clearly perceptible improvement in upper-bass and mid-range sound output from my mains when I set Mains as SMALL and assign Bass to SUB only, with the sub having good musicality. There is a clearer separation and improvement across the entire sound spectrum. MY AVR - the erstwhile flagship Yamaha RX-V2092 (5 x 100 wpc + 2 x 25 wpc); Mains - british made TDL (now extinct co. - both props deceased:( transmission line floorstanders clocked by UK audio enthusiasts as outputting clean 30 Hz bass. SUB: new Polk DSW PRO 500.
 

Srinath_Murthy

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Jan 24, 2008
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Mumbai
Mandeep, In my experience, there is a clearly perceptible improvement in upper-bass and mid-range sound output from my mains when I set Mains as SMALL and assign Bass to SUB only, with the sub having good musicality. There is a clearer separation and improvement across the entire sound spectrum. MY AVR - the erstwhile flagship Yamaha RX-V2092 (5 x 100 wpc + 2 x 25 wpc); Mains - british made TDL (now extinct co. - both props deceased:( transmission line floorstanders clocked by UK audio enthusiasts as outputting clean 30 Hz bass. SUB: new Polk DSW PRO 500.

Mandeep,

Sorry that I missed the "why" part of your question. I'd like to attempt answering it thus: Apparently, it is the bass range of signals that are most power hungry. When you are removing this heavier part of the load and giving it to the Sub's power amp, you are freeing up more headroom in your AVR to deliver more power cleanly to your mains. Secondly, the mains now are relieved of outputting the lowest end bass range of audio that could possibly be "muddying" up the rest of the range as well. So, the benefits appeear to be two-fold. Cheers!
 
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