Receiver volume control display

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ranojoy

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Can anyone throw some light about what exactly the "-xx db" volume indicator in a receiver means ? For example, I find that I am confortable with a volume of -35 db in my Yamaha AVR. So what does this -35 db actually mean ?
We know that in general, increasing the loudness by 3 db normally requires double the amplifier power. Does the display have any relation to this issue at all ?
 

ebirbal

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The -xx refers to the volume relative to a reference point. This reference point at 0db typically refers to the "half power" of the maximum rated power of the amplifier. For example, if your reciever is capable of outputting a maximum of 80 watts per channel, then at 0db reading, its outputting at "half power" or 40 watts per channel. This is assuming that you have not calibrated any +/- gains for individual channels. What this also means is that, at +10 reading, the amp will double its power and at -10db it would halve the power.

A more simplistic view is that at 0db, your amp will have the capability to play at its best quality and beyond it, there may be excessive distortion or even clipping.

PS: note that I have used the term "reference point" and not "reference level".

HTH
 
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Shuvc

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What this also means is that, at +10 reading, the amp will double its power and at -10db it would halve the power.
Is it a pure linear graph or exponential?

The reason I asked is, my Denon has a range of -70 to + 18 (if I recall correctly)
 

ebirbal

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Is it a pure linear graph or exponential?

Its logarithmic actually.

The power ratings you see on most receivers refer to the continuous power that the amp is able to deliver (Root Mean Square or RMS for short), but are usually quiet capable of delivering much higher peak outputs momentarily, which allows for more headroom beyond +10db
 
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