Upgradable amps?

Wharfedale Linton Heritage Speakers

svelc

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Can you guys help me understand what upgradeable term means in hi-fi world?

Thanks a lot.
 

cyrus

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Can you guys help me understand what upgradeable term means in hi-fi world?

Thanks a lot.

It basically means that you can upgrade from one model to the next higher model by just paying the difference in price between the two.
 

svelc

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It basically means that you can upgrade from one model to the next higher model by just paying the difference in price between the two.

Thanks Cyrus :).

That is a cool deal. I wonder why this is not followed in other segments like cell phone, camera and etc.
 

reubensm

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It basically means that you can upgrade from one model to the next higher model by just paying the difference in price between the two.

I've always had to sell off my existing gear when going for an upgrade. Never handed in equipment to a dealer during an upgrade. Dealers usually pay less than the actual worth of the used gear.

My 2 cents.
 

reubensm

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Can you guys help me understand what upgradeable term means in hi-fi world?

Thanks a lot.

This term can be viewed in different contexts.

If you see the term "upgradeable" printed on the spec sheet of equipment, it would mean that you can purchase an add-on module, slip it into the equipment and upgrade its functionality. One easy example to relate to is the case with the modern NAD integrated amplifiers. One can upgrade these amps to make them compatible with turntables or cd transports by adding on a phonostage module or dac module.

In another context, enthusiasts may upgrade their gear regularly. This simply means, they either sell off or decommission their existing equipment and go in for equipment which is more widely reviwed and acknowledged to be better than their existing equipment, and in most cases, more expensive as well. An example of this would be to upgrade from a Technics SL3200 turntable to a Technics SL1200 turntable.

The existing equipment is often sold or sometimes traded as part of the deal for purchasing better equipment (considered the upgrade). In some cases, the enthusiast may retain equipment for use as a second system, etc.

The converse of upgrade, which is down-grade, is also possible. It is the reverse of both the above. One can downgrade or downscale equipment by removing modules resulting in less features, or downscale a rig by removing audio components. Downscalling is normally done with change in economic circumstances, social circumstances, listening tastes and styles, etc.

Hope this helps.
 
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