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Video Quality of BluRay rips

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madbullram

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This is more of a curious polymath kind of question :)

I see a loads of compression details when people rip BluRay disk. For example look at these two:

720P rip:
RELEASE.NAME..: The.Dark.Knight.2008.720p.BluRay.DTS.x264-ESiR
RELEASE.DATE..: 24.11.2008
THEATRE.DATE..: 14.06.2008
RUNTiME.......: 2:32:13
SiZE..........: 7.9 GB
ViDEO.CODEC...: x264
FRAMERATE.....: 23.976
BiTRATE.......: 5850 kbps
RESOLUTiON....: 1280x720
AUDiO1........: English DTS 5.1 1.5 mbit
AUDiO2........: English vorbis 2.0 commentary
SUBTiTLES.....: Eng,Ro,Fre,Spa,Por,Ger,Dut,Swe,Fin,Nor,Dan,Hun - ASS
SOURCE........: The Dark Knight Blu-Ray 1080p VC1 TrueHD 5.1

1080p Rip
RECODE RiPPER...: chp@CHD
RELEASE DATE....: 11/22/2008
THEATRE DATE....: 2008
GENRE...........: Action / Adventure / Crime
SOURCE TYPE.....: Blu-Ray VC1 1080P
ViDEO BiTRATE...: x264 @ 10762 kbps
FRAME RATE......: 23.976 fps
AUDiO BiTRATE...: DTS 5.1 1536K(From TrueHD)
RUNTiME.........: 152 mins
ASPECT RATiO....: 2.40:1+1.78 IMAX
RESOLUTiON......: 1920 X 1080
LANGUAGE........: English
SUBTiTLES.......: Chinese
FilE SiZE.......: 4.35G*3
iMDB URL........: The Dark Knight (2008)
iMDB RATiNG.....: 9.1/10 (297,038 votes)

Questions:
1. 720p is encoded at 5850 and 1080 at 10762. What would be the difference when played in 720 tv and 1080 TV? If you have a 720p TV does the extra 6 GB justify the quality difference?

2. The orginal BluRay came with TrueHD, but the ripper has encoded it into DTS. Is there a significance benefit (not bcos DTS has more bandwidth but from end uder hearing quality) of ripping a TrueHD to DTS than a Dolby.

3. Anything else you can find?
 

marsilians

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Questions:
1. 720p is encoded at 5850 and 1080 at 10762. What would be the difference when played in 720 tv and 1080 TV? If you have a 720p TV does the extra 6 GB justify the quality difference?

No and no. Most times the particular rate is chosen as a means to control the output file size. The first one fits on a DL disk while the second rip fits on a single layer DVD disk.

There are no true 1080P rips. 720P is better or equivalent to 1080i in my personal opinion.

2. The orginal BluRay came with TrueHD, but the ripper has encoded it into DTS. Is there a significance benefit (not bcos DTS has more bandwidth but from end uder hearing quality) of ripping a TrueHD to DTS than a Dolby.


I am assuming you are referring to TrueHD needing more bandwidth than DTS and not the other way around. Between DTS and Dolby encoding, its hard to say which sounds better in rips. On normal DVDs and DTS CDs, the lesser compressed DTS definitely sounds dynamic and puts out a very broad soundstage on a good audio setup. On rips, I am hard pressed to say there will not be noticeable differences.
 

madbullram

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No and no. Most times the particular rate is chosen as a means to control the output file size. The first one fits on a DL disk while the second rip fits on a single layer DVD disk.

There are no true 1080P rips. 720P is better or equivalent to 1080i in my personal opinion. .

Thats interesting. So whats the benefit of encoding it at higher Video Bitrate if the quality is not noticeable? So are you saying 1080p encoded in 10762 and 720p encoded at 5850 will look the same in a HD Ready 720p TV and HD 1080P TV?

Sorry if I am being dumb here!


I am assuming you are referring to TrueHD needing more bandwidth than DTS and not the other way around. Between DTS and Dolby encoding, its hard to say which sounds better in rips. On normal DVDs and DTS CDs, the lesser compressed DTS definitely sounds dynamic and puts out a very broad soundstage on a good audio setup. On rips, I am hard pressed to say there will not be noticeable differences.

yes. Thats what I was asking, I mean TrueHD bandwidth is way higher now when these guys decompress it to DTS at 1.5 is it anyway better than a Dolby as Dolby also means file size is less.
 

marsilians

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Thats interesting. So whats the benefit of encoding it at higher Video Bitrate if the quality is not noticeable? So are you saying 1080p encoded in 10762 and 720p encoded at 5850 will look the same in a HD Ready 720p TV and HD 1080P TV?

Like I said before, there are no true 1080P rips. So you shouldn't see a difference just because it has a better sampling rate. Why not download both and give them a try and let everyone know. Unfortunately I don't download movies from torrents. So can't say from experience.

yes. Thats what I was asking, I mean TrueHD bandwidth is way higher now when these guys decompress it to DTS at 1.5 is it anyway better than a Dolby as Dolby also means file size is less.

DTS is sampled at 1.4 Mbps vs DD at 384-448 Kbps. Theoretically it should sound better. but the software used for rips has to be almost perfect to distinguish this. Also its harder to rip to 5.1 channels vs. the standard 2.0. So I am saying they many not be noticeable. Again, you can confirm by sacrificing a single layer and dual layer disk for everyone's benefit.
 
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