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Western Classical Music

Wharfedale EVO 4.1 4.2 Speakers

jls001

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Richard Strauss' other tone poems are also worthy of serious discovery. Also Sprach Zarathustra, Don Juan, Alpine Symphony, etc.
 

skroderider

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Deutsche Grammophon has opened up some of their Western Classical (video) recordings online for free (not sure for how long though)


Or by the way the current flavor of the season is the NOS AD1862 R-2R dac and I have built one last year ;)
Pretty good being 20bit dac does max of 24bit 192khz max resolution but who cares

Detailed build thread for reference -
My build reference - https://www.hifivision.com/threads/diy-ad1862-nos-r-2r-dac.82857/
 

skroderider

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... Ahhh, a lot of getting up to change sides! ;)

But I wish my half-century-old classical vinyl was still playable. Sadly, due to youth, ceramic cartridges and, probably, blunt styli, it is not.

I doubt that I'll build either a vinyl or a CD collection of W classical ever again, but, I have (with recent reawakening of enjoyment) bought some FLAC downloads from eclassical.com. High res available, too.


No need to understand it. Just enjoy.

Actually, that's my approach to music in general :)

If you do want to understand more, there is a wonderful series of lectures, which I learnt about here on HFV...

Prof Craig Wright,Yale University, Listening to Music.

...Brilliant, and thoroughly enjoyable.

There is a Coursera (free) version of Prof. Wright's course now - I completed it last year. As you said, it's a delight. One of best online courses I have done - https://www.coursera.org/learn/introclassicalmusic/
 

Lizard King

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one of my favourites too. was wondering how nobody had mentioned it yet until i saw your post :D
Vivaldi's Quattro Stagioni can indeed be a stepping stone to Western Classical for a novice, and then continue to be a favorite forever.


Here is one of my favorite versions, conducted by Trevor Pinnock and the English Concert, Simon Standage doing the honors on violin.
Although you cannot go wrong with the 4 Seasons. I have a total 7 versions of them on physical media :)
 

Lizard King

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Mahler was not even 30 when he composed Titan. Sign of what the word "Mahlerian" would stand to mean. Gigantic, ponderous, deep, and profound. Yet earthy. It's still possibly the most accessible Mahler.
And yes, it will test your $6000 hifi system to its limits. Hell Yeah.


If the 1st Symphony is a elaborate Roman feast, its 2nd movement, 'Hunter's Funeral' is the 'antipasto', the easily digestible appetite stimulant. The 'McMahler', if ever the was one.
 

Lizard King

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All Mahler leaves you spellbound.

I just recovered enough to reflect upon the fact that when Claudio Abbado was conducting his band of young genius musicians, he was terminal with stomach cancer. Multiple surgeries had left him without a way to eat normally. He was in constant pain, and a rubber tube hidden under his clothes that poured food directly into his intestine.

A whole lifetime of tribute is not enough for his talent/contribution.
 

Nalzan

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All Mahler leaves you spellbound.

I just recovered enough to reflect upon the fact that when Claudio Abbado was conducting his band of young genius musicians, he was terminal with stomach cancer. Multiple surgeries had left him without a way to eat normally. He was in constant pain, and a rubber tube hidden under his clothes that poured food directly into his intestine.

A whole lifetime of tribute is not enough for his talent/contribution.
Completely agree with you! A great conductor some of his performances remain benchmark versions!
 

Fiftyfifty

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Vivaldi's Quattro Stagioni can indeed be a stepping stone to Western Classical for a novice, and then continue to be a favorite forever.


Here is one of my favorite versions, conducted by Trevor Pinnock and the English Concert, Simon Standage doing the honors on violin.
Although you cannot go wrong with the 4 Seasons. I have a total 7 versions of them on physical media :)
Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker Suites would also fall in this category - I mean as a stepping stone that remains a favourite even as you explore more complex compositions.
 

arj

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Vivaldi's Quattro Stagioni can indeed be a stepping stone to Western Classical for a novice, and then continue to be a favorite forever.


Here is one of my favorite versions, conducted by Trevor Pinnock and the English Concert, Simon Standage doing the honors on violin.
Although you cannot go wrong with the 4 Seasons. I have a total 7 versions of them on physical media :)

My knowledge of western classical is very limited , but it was the piece from Winter, Largo which hooked me in early 2000's when I heard it at the then Sonus Faber website. I still am moved that piece and had it as my ring tone for some time until I realised I am not picking up the phone because I either dont hear it since it is soft, and when i do wait to hear some more of it :D

While I could never really progress much to larger symphonies but loved the collection by London Philharmonic- 50 Greatest pieces of Classical music
Adagio for springs, Ride of the Valkyres, Blue Danube, Finlandia , Hall of the mountain king, all the Mozart and Beethoven pieces and a few more are pieces I have grown to truly love
 

SEANDSILVA

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Thanks to @SEANDSILVA and @Lizard King for reviving this thread :)
What, in the opinion of you connoisseurs, is the best version of Stravinsky's Rites of Spring, Ravel's Bolero?

@Fiftyfifty I am totally unqualified to comment on the nuances and complexities of classical music. I prefer the plaintive strains of the baroque era which preceded it -always so much going on within a piece which I find quite uplifting! see this
I am always intrigued by the myriad and fascinating interpretations of famous baroque and classical compositions over the years by contemporary artists so imho there's nothing like a 'best version'. It's like taking a piece, adding a little bit of your sauce and passing it on...To me, this is how music is meant to evolve and grow :)
A longer version of Ravel's Bolero by Radio France.
For Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring, watch this concert conducted by the famous Jaap van Zweden.
 

soundbuff

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My introduction to classical music was when I was around 18 years old, and a very intense teenager. I was lent this LP of J S Bach's fugues and organ pieces. I put it on late one night, when my parents were not at home, and I was hooked. The cadence of changes and variations was better than any intoxicant! The piece "Passacaglia and fugue in C minor" remains a favourite as I reach my retirement years!
Something like that was my introduction too. Helmut Walcha was the organist. I was much younger though, about 13. I was lent that record by a neighbour lady along with the pastoral.
 
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