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AVR power spec

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krishnamurthy

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Many AVR's do not provide the spec for the power of the amplifier over the full frequency range (20 Hz to 20 kHz) at low distortion (0.1 percent or less) in continuous operation.
Many a time i see this spec given at 1 Khz or some other frequency.

How can one figure out the true capabilities?
 
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Fantastic

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As a user you don't need continuous ( sine wave) power ratings. Most signals are running at an average power level from 1/5th to 1/20 th the peak levels ( clipping levels) . If it can do this without over heating it is fine. A sine wave continuous test as used in the lab is not required at home. The limitation is usually the power supply and heat sink. Both cost a lot of money. So most lower priced systems have supplies and heat sinks which can handle regular music signals continuously where sections ( usually the bass ) clips occasionally. A 50 watt stereo amp with 86 or 88 dB/watt speaker can play very loud in an average home. Loud enough that you cannot converse at normal speech levels.

So if it says 50 watts x5 or 50 watts x 7 it may be just clipping levels. Tested with continuous sine waves on all channels it might not be able to deliver 50 watts on all channels together. Does it matter ? No.
Play the amp and see if you can play it as loud as you want. If it can, it's OK. Between 50 and 70 watts you aren't going to hear any difference unless the 70 watt amp has a very much larger power supply. If it does 50 watts in stereo mode continuously ( stated as continuous rms power) the amp should be fine. This information is usually given.
Speaker sensitivity also comes into the picture over here. Always try to settle for a more sensitive speaker. There are more reasons than one for this.

Don't bother about 0.1% distortion. All that's rubbish for movies and other video programs. Most systems are played right into clipping where distortion on clipping is over 10% and no one cares ! Even the need to be given 20 to 20 Khz data is unnecessary. All modern amps can reproduce 20 to 20 Khz very easily. They could even do with dropping such information as it can be taken for granted. Anything that can't do this is a 'poorer' system and will not survive for long except in the low price mass market systems.
In fact the difference between a 20Hz to 20 Khz rated system and a 30Hz to 15 Khz rated system is negligible . Most people wouldn't even hear any difference. There are other factors that are far more important. We are talking about systems for watching movies.

I'm guessing that everyone on this forum has a rather higher acceptance bar than the mass market so at the price they are willing to pay, many common specs can be practically taken for granted.
But systems with similar common specs can sound vastly different to the ear.
That's where opinions of forum members can be helpful. You can't get to hear all systems on your own.
All the best.
 

elangoas

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Many AVR's do not provide the spec for the power of the amplifier over the full frequency range (20 Hz to 20 kHz) at low distortion (0.1 percent or less) in continuous operation.
Many a time i see this spec given at 1 Khz or some other frequency.

How can one figure out the true capabilities?
One way to roughly find it is, look @ center channel information... If it says 80W in to 8 ohms 20Hz - 20 Khz, then you can safely assume that in stereo mode the amp will consistently produce 50W/channel when both channels are driven simultaneously...
 

krishnamurthy

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If the input power to the FS states requirement of 20-200 w is required, what should be the power capability of the AVR that i need to look at?
Sensitivity of the speaker is 90 db.
Should i factor in SNR of more than 100 db while selecting an AVR (seems like most of them exceed that threshold?)
 

Rastapopulus

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If you are buying a receiver, then worrying too much on these specs of distortion and SNR will not bring audible differences.

When a speaker specs suggest amp of x-y watts, it means the speaker will produce sound from x watts and maximum power it can handle is y watts.

You should be good if you get a n amplifier which has max power rates within that range.

Just get a good brand entry to mid level avr and you should be good. Most good brands like Yamaha, marantz etc have similar specs.

Please note the ohms rating on the speaker and match with the avr!!
That will risk blowing your amp or speaker if mismatched badly. Example, running a 4 ohms speaker using avr rates for 8ohms (and play loud volumes)
 
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