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Blu Ray Player - USA made cycles problem.

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deba

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Dear All,

Most of the Blu Ray players purchased from USA (may be via 20North) has its input voltage fixed at 110 V for which you will need a step down transformer but the Input Cycles is fixed at 60Hz whereas in India its 50Hz.

How do you address the problem of Cycles because the speed of the Motor should also change - Kindly discuss and guide.

Thanks.
 

anilva

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Dear All,

Most of the Blu Ray players purchased from USA (may be via 20North) has its input voltage fixed at 110 V for which you will need a step down transformer but the Input Cycles is fixed at 60Hz whereas in India its 50Hz.

How do you address the problem of Cycles because the speed of the Motor should also change - Kindly discuss and guide.

Thanks.

I have a Sony BDP-360 ordered from 20North and works perfectly well here. I just use a 110v stepdown transformer. I do not think the player takes the power source frequency to do motor control. I am sure the motors are DC motors inside the BD player. No problem, you can go ahead and order them.

Cheers
 

naveen

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I have a Sony BDP-360 ordered from 20North and works perfectly well here. I just use a 110v stepdown transformer. I do not think the player takes the power source frequency to do motor control. I am sure the motors are DC motors inside the BD player. No problem, you can go ahead and order them.

Cheers

Hi Anil,

I have ordered a Panasonic BD60 from 20north. Can you help me with the right step down transformer. Per the website it consumes 22W , does this mean that I can use a 100W step down transformer ? or do I need a 200W one ? . Also do you have any info on how much this costs and which are the good brands .
 

aneelr

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Hi Anil,

I have ordered a Panasonic BD60 from 20north. Can you help me with the right step down transformer. Per the website it consumes 22W , does this mean that I can use a 100W step down transformer ? or do I need a 200W one ? . Also do you have any info on how much this costs and which are the good brands .

A 100W would do if you're planning to use it exclusively for the BD-60, but if you're going to use different equipments with different power ratings, the you may have to choose accordingly. I'm using a 50W with my BD-60 (only) and it's working fine.

cheers.
 

aneelr

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Dear All,

Most of the Blu Ray players purchased from USA (may be via 20North) has its input voltage fixed at 110 V for which you will need a step down transformer but the Input Cycles is fixed at 60Hz whereas in India its 50Hz.

How do you address the problem of Cycles because the speed of the Motor should also change - Kindly discuss and guide.

Thanks.

Hi,

I guess voltage converters or transformers do not change cycles (50hz or 60hz), but the difference in voltage levels may cause a motorized 60Hz device to operate at 50Hz.

cheers
 

anilva

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Hi,

I guess voltage converters or transformers do not change cycles (50hz or 60hz), but the difference in voltage levels may cause a motorized 60Hz device to operate at 50Hz.

cheers

No amount of voltage changes will change the frequency i.e. 60Hz to 50Hz. The motor will not adjust or change. It will simply use whatever input frequency is available. For some motors who are dependent on the frequency (ac synch motors) will alter their speeds due to this.

DC motors, which have no dependency on the source frequency will run at their predetermined rpm. Most of the blurays, CD players etc. run on small dc motors. No problem with them at all to use with different source frequencies.

Some turntable motors are AC sync motors and they will exhibit speed changes from one frequency to another.

Hope this clarifies.

As far as step down transformers are concerned, try with your nearest electrical shop and they will have a wall mount and sometimes a separate box based ones. Use something like 100W rating and you are very safe.

Cheers.
 

sanjay0864

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Dear All,

Most of the Blu Ray players purchased from USA (may be via 20North) has its input voltage fixed at 110 V for which you will need a step down transformer but the Input Cycles is fixed at 60Hz whereas in India its 50Hz.

How do you address the problem of Cycles because the speed of the Motor should also change - Kindly discuss and guide.

Thanks.
Frequency Cycles, be it 50Hz or 60 Hz are a non issue here, quite simply because most electronics, even though they take an AC input, internally use DC. DC is not affected by Frequency cycles.
 

psj

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Iam using a convertor rather than a step down transformer for my BR Player.will this cause problems?
 

sanjay0864

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Iam using a convertor rather than a step down transformer for my BR Player.will this cause problems?
A converter is the same as a step down transformer. You should have no problems using your "converter". Ofcourse you have to make sure your converter/step-down transformer, is capable of handling your Blu-Ray player's load.
 

deba

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MX is making a 50 watt Step Down Transformer for this purpose.Most Blu Ray Players are rated at 25Watt.
(Pics attached)
 

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just4kix

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I have Sony BDP-S360 purchased in USA. I am using a step down transformer for this and there is no problem.

As pointed out by anilva, the entire circuit inside runs on DC. There is a AC~DC converter at the AC input and all it requires is a step down voltage x'former. AC cycles do not matter.
 

naveen

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MX is making a 50 watt Step Down Transformer for this purpose.Most Blu Ray Players are rated at 25Watt.
(Pics attached)

Somewhere I read that converters are not safe but transformers are. They menttoned that there is a chance of burnout for converters. I am not an expert in this area so just sharing what I read. I bought a 100W transformer from SP road for Rs:475 ( Raksha Brand ) . I am waiting for 20north to deliver my player , hopefully early nect week.

Question : I asked the SP road guy to test the step down transformer and the meter showed 120 to 124 range instead of 110. His justification was that the actual voltage is more than 250 so it cannot really reduced to 110. Will this be an issue when I connect to my BD60 player ?
 

deba

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What is the actual difference between "convertors" and "step down transformers" ?
 

pnreddy

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Converters are not the same as step down transformers. Converters are meant only for heating devices like electric blankets, coffee makers where the load is usually a heating load. Here the converter supplies the power only for one half of each cycle thereby averaging it to about 110 volts. The voltage applied for that one-half cycle is 220 V. So if you use a converter for a DVD player then it is sure to burn out as the voltage applied is 220 on a 110 V player. So make sure you get a good quality step down transformer for a DVD player. For a 20 W rated player 50 watt step down transformer is adequate but to be on the safe side use a 100 watt transformer.

P.N.Reddy
 
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