Subwoofer for apartments

Nids

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Is a subwoofer an overkill for an apartment? Will the neighbors be affected if we use a subwoofer at apartments?
I am planning to add a subwoofer and I have seen many in my apartments complaining about the bass effect.

Wanted to get other members' experience.
 

aeroash

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Is a subwoofer an overkill for an apartment? Will the neighbors be affected if we use a subwoofer at apartments?
I am planning to add a subwoofer and I have seen many in my apartments complaining about the bass effect.

Wanted to get other members' experience.
Here's an option if you want them to permanently move out!

Ascendo SMSG50,​

840_560.jpg
 

Love4sound

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Is a subwoofer an overkill for an apartment? Will the neighbors be affected if we use a subwoofer at apartments?
I am planning to add a subwoofer and I have seen many in my apartments complaining about the bass effect.

Wanted to get other members' experience.
I live in a 2 story apartment and in the second floor which is the top floor. I use dual Rythmik’s but don’t listen loud or at reference levels. If you don’t listen at high volumes and have a small to medium room a good sealed sub shouldn’t cause much problems to the neighbours.
 

ssf

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I use a 15 inch sub in my apartment but most of the time you can hardly tell it if it is on. And I have wonderful neighbors. They don't complain on the rare occasion that I play metal loud for nostalgia's sake and I don't complain when their children create a racket outside my door.

So, yes you can have subs in apartments if you have good neighbors or if you don't play too loud.

Edit: Also, you could try out the sub posted by @aeroash. I have read that it blends quite nicely with bookshelfs.
 
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Avinash Pai

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I got the KEF Kube10b to pair with my Quad S2s. It has been good going so far. It adds warmth but is not room shaking. (In all fairness, I have not tried it at those volumes either). This is a 10 inch sealed sub and perhaps would work in an apartment for music. Not sure about movies and larger rooms though.
 

rshri

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The AVRs have subwoofer sound containment settings that you can try. Not sure how effective those are though
 

imagineer

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I am planning to get a 12 inch sub and my tv area is around 7*10 feet
12 inch sub will be overkill, I guess. It will also eat up more of the precious space and difficult to place.
I had a Phillips and then LG HTIB, both had 8/6 inch subs, I believe. They produced enough room shake for me and the neigbhors.

As of now, I've a 12 inch sub and 4 floor standers in HT. If you've noticed from replies, many have multiple subs in apartment setup. Subs are rarely in action, but when they get into it... They rock it for few seconds and go back to hibernation (or at least 'Not going to neigbhors' ) mode.

Also, Is this room a closed area or does it open partially or fully to adjacent areas? That will affect the sub performance as well.

If you are worried about Low frequencies traveling to neigbhors (they do), you might want to explore bass shakers and basic sealed subs. On a lighter note, keep inviting your neighbours occassionally for listening / cinema sessions. They'll learn to appreciate and ignore.
 

DB1989

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Looks like I will be making a few new friends (or enemies ) in my apartment...
I suppose it depends on the construction of the building as well. I live in the second floor of a DDA apartment and its been nearly 4 years since i've had a sub in my Ht/Music setup and despite playing music/movies regularly at levels which any reasonable person would consider loud, I'm yet to get a noise complaint. Been a year since i added a second sub and approx a couple since i added a 15" ported sub and so far so good.

For reference, at a listening level of 90db (i usually listen to content around that mark +/- 10db.), my subs dig to 22hz before rolling off and residing at approx 80db till 14hz.
 

k-pad

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Is a subwoofer an overkill for an apartment? Will the neighbors be affected if we use a subwoofer at apartments?
I am planning to add a subwoofer and I have seen many in my apartments complaining about the bass effect.

Wanted to get other members' experience.
Depends on floor and sidewall proximity with neighbouring homes.
If your room is surrounded by your own home areas and there is no shared walls with same floor neighbours, no issue on that count.
That leaves us with the downstairs neighbour.
Check with builder/architect the thickness of the concrete floor. In most, new buildings, this too is not a problem.

For safety sake, you can keep the sub as close by your listening position as possible. Then, anything up to 90-95 dB of bass doesn't permeate downstairs. (purely from personal experience)

I too was very worried, but today, the only complaints are from inside the house :D

Enjoy.
 

Nids

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12 inch sub will be overkill, I guess. It will also eat up more of the precious space and difficult to place.
I had a Phillips and then LG HTIB, both had 8/6 inch subs, I believe. They produced enough room shake for me and the neigbhors.

As of now, I've a 12 inch sub and 4 floor standers in HT. If you've noticed from replies, many have multiple subs in apartment setup. Subs are rarely in action, but when they get into it... They rock it for few seconds and go back to hibernation (or at least 'Not going to neigbhors' ) mode.

Also, Is this room a closed area or does it open partially or fully to adjacent areas? That will affect the sub performance as well.

If you are worried about Low frequencies traveling to neigbhors (they do), you might want to explore bass shakers and basic sealed subs. On a lighter note, keep inviting your neighbours occassionally for listening / cinema sessions. They'll learn to appreciate and ignore.
It is an L-shaped living room with a TV area towards the side of the balcony window. I also share a common living room wall with my neighbors.
 

Nids

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Depends on floor and sidewall proximity with neighbouring homes.
If your room is surrounded by your own home areas and there is no shared walls with same floor neighbours, no issue on that count.
That leaves us with the downstairs neighbour.
Check with builder/architect the thickness of the concrete floor. In most, new buildings, this too is not a problem.

For safety sake, you can keep the sub as close by your listening position as possible. Then, anything up to 90-95 dB of bass doesn't permeate downstairs. (purely from personal experience)

I too was very worried, but today, the only complaints are from inside the house :D

Enjoy.
I share a concrete wall with my neighbor. I am in a good relationship with them so will inform them prior. And as others mentioned, will invite them over for tea.
 

Decadent_Spectre

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My daily listening levels are about 110db, when I go loud it's about 130db. In over a decade I have had no issues. Room is sound proofed and acoustically treated. The key here is to treat the room and sound proof it.

I live in an apartment.
 

k-pad

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I share a concrete wall with my neighbor. I am in a good relationship with them so will inform them prior. And as others mentioned, will invite them over for tea.
Go one better.
Play your system 10 dB higher than normal and go to their place. Sit in their living room with both your doors closed.
See how much of LFs leak.
Have someone in your house, and keep dialling down the volume.
A) The time you hear nothing is your ideal listening volume without disturbing neighbours.
Now, come back to your house. Listen to the above volume/SPL. Is it audible/legible? Keep and be happy.

No?
Then, keep tuning down the sub (placed close to your listening position) as you increase dialogue audibility.
Find your ideal listening SPL and level. This will be B.

Either A or some point Between A and B will be your ideal listening level without disturbing neighbours, while also enjoying decent bass

Enjoy.
 

k-pad

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My daily listening levels are about 110db, when I go loud it's about 130db. In over a decade I have had no issues. Room is sound proofed and acoustically treated. The key here is to treat the room and sound proof it.

I live in an apartment.
Great solution, Dec.
If OP wants to do this and can afford this, this is the best solution.

But, most of us can't/don't listen at those dBs...
And soundproofing + room treatment is prohibitively expensive. Anywhere in India.
 

aeroash

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My daily listening levels are about 110db, when I go loud it's about 130db. In over a decade I have had no issues. Room is sound proofed and acoustically treated. The key here is to treat the room and sound proof it.

I live in an apartment.
OP, the key is to turn up the volume and soundproof your room, so that you can never hear your neighbours pounding on your door.
 
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