Any Windows 10 FMs switched to 11?

k-pad

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Hi all,
PC's been prompting for a long time.
Anyone tried it?
What are the big pros and cons you have noticed?
Most important, how does it behave with slightly older hardware? (Mine's a three-year-old i7 intel that's been doing really well so far)
Any inputs and observations most welcome.
Regards
 

Decadent_Spectre

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What do you hope to gain?

My personal view on Windows (after XP) has always been to wait till the kinks are out. I usually wait a few years. In my experience new versions of Windows don't offer anything for my use except for some features, these features are usually not critical and I can make do without them. Most of the time I move to newer windows primarily because hardware (and sometimes software) demands it. When it is new getting stable drivers for hardware that is not common can also be difficult. Of course often the overall user experience is smoother and easier but at what cost? Consider not only the cost of hardware but how much performance gains have been made, I feel that considering this the user experience needs to be better than what it actually is for new versions of Windows.

I will leave you with one of my favorite sayings.

"If it ain't broke don't fix it."
 

efernand1

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My HP 240 G6 Laptop came with Windows 10 professional and still enjoy it. Now I gave that to my kid to use for school. Still an excellent workhorse. i3 6th Gen, 8GB DDR 4 1 TB HDD..this is 4 years old and Win 10 support is there from Microsoft till Oct 2025.

My hands got a bit itchy as Office gave us Lenovo to use and I liked the Laptop instantly. Did a good research since Sep 2021 and finally took a plunge picked a Thinkbook 13s during the first week of this month. Boots up 8 secs flat. Battery lasts for 7-9 hours.


Got this on Lightening deal for 69k. This was the best price then when i checked all sources including dealers at Lamington Road. I just love the Aluminum built and premium finish, the performance is really good. It came with Windows 10 and instantly prompted a Windows 11 upgrade. I am using Win 11 now and honestly don't see much difference, things seem more personalised etc. Lets see ahead, perhaps I will see the difference.

I believe in order to get Windows 11, processor needs to have 2 cores or more and if from i3 or i5 or i7, minimum needs to be 10th Gen and above. Microsoft has a tool you can download to check if your hardware is compatible with Win 11 or not. Sadly cant update the HP 240 G6 but that's fine as long as there is support till Oct 2025.
 

k-pad

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My HP 240 G6 Laptop came with Windows 10 professional and still enjoy it. Now I gave that to my kid to use for school. Still an excellent workhorse. i3 6th Gen, 8GB DDR 4 1 TB HDD..this is 4 years old and Win 10 support is there from Microsoft till Oct 2025.

My hands got a bit itchy as Office gave us Lenovo to use and I liked the Laptop instantly. Did a good research since Sep 2021 and finally took a plunge picked a Thinkbook 13s during the first week of this month. Boots up 8 secs flat. Battery lasts for 7-9 hours.
8-second boot time is very tempting!
Have timed mine, and this bugger's a fluggish sluck. Takes at a min and 20 sec.
But, i can live with it.

Got this on Lightening deal for 69k. This was the best price then when i checked all sources including dealers at Lamington Road. I just love the Aluminum built and premium finish, the performance is really good. It came with Windows 10 and instantly prompted a Windows 11 upgrade. I am using Win 11 now and honestly don't see much difference, things seem more personalised etc. Lets see ahead, perhaps I will see the difference.
This soothes the soul. If no great hardware acceleration, no go. :)

I believe in order to get Windows 11, processor needs to have 2 cores or more and if from i3 or i5 or i7, minimum needs to be 10th Gen and above. Microsoft has a tool you can download to check if your hardware is compatible with Win 11 or not. Sadly cant update the HP 240 G6 but that's fine as long as there is support till Oct 2025.
Have been offered 11 in notifs for a while now.
Mine's an i7 8XXX... Will give it some time i guess.
 

k-pad

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What do you hope to gain?
Some spiffiness.
To be sure, my comp's quite agile, but I feel it should not be as sluggish as it is.
I suspect the problem lies elsewhere.
But just wanted to be sure.
Point of the question was to check if 11 gels well with existing hardware.
@efernand1's eight-second boot was something I used to have three years ago.
But it's got sluggish with age.
My personal view on Windows (after XP) has always been to wait till the kinks are out.
On the contrary, in my experience, the time between 7 and before XP was the worst as a PC user.
XP onwards, I think the fixes came much faster.

I usually wait a few years. In my experience new versions of Windows don't offer anything for my use except for some features, these features are usually not critical and I can make do without them. Most of the time I move to newer windows primarily because hardware (and sometimes software) demands it.
That's a good path. Makes sense, yes.
When it is new getting stable drivers for hardware that is not common can also be difficult. Of course often the overall user experience is smoother and easier but at what cost? Consider not only the cost of hardware but how much performance gains have been made, I feel that considering this the user experience needs to be better than what it actually is for new versions of Windows.
Agree.
I will leave you with one of my favorite sayings.

"If it ain't broke don't fix it."
Of course. Like another FM said in another thread (which I myself follow for my android updates) nothing wrong in being n+1 :)

But, here, I just wanted to hear the experiences of FMs who have updated 10 to 11.

@efernand1 has given a part of the story (two devices)
But would be nice if FMs who have upgraded from 10 to 11 with old hardware also give their opinion.
 

MaSh

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Well if you do not use any driver or version specific hardware or software, then go for it.

MaSh
 

amrutmhatre90

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First question is do you have a desktop or laptop?
I have upgraded on my Acer Nitro 5, which is 8gb ram, i5 and 1060ti GPU with SSD. But for some reason after the update 5ghz wifi has been glitchy and not able to connect. I have tried all possible methods and it keeps failing. This machine is used for downloading stuff and it is painful using 30mbps after getting used to 100mbps.

I have 3 laptops I use,
Acer Nitro 5 - personnel laptop
HP Elitebook with i7 16gb 1tb ssd - work laptop
HP pavilion g6 with 4gb and 1tb - used as server

Though boot times are super fast on Windows 11, 2-5secs I assume, but I am going back to Windows 10 on Acer Nitro and won't update other laptops due to the wifi glitch.
It may happen to certain devices, not all are affected.

I would suggest wait, if it ain't broken why fix it?
 

Sean de Silva

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What do you hope to gain?

My personal view on Windows (after XP) has always been to wait till the kinks are out. I usually wait a few years. In my experience new versions of Windows don't offer anything for my use except for some features, these features are usually not critical and I can make do without them. Most of the time I move to newer windows primarily because hardware (and sometimes software) demands it. When it is new getting stable drivers for hardware that is not common can also be difficult. Of course often the overall user experience is smoother and easier but at what cost? Consider not only the cost of hardware but how much performance gains have been made, I feel that considering this the user experience needs to be better than what it actually is for new versions of Windows.

I will leave you with one of my favorite sayings.

"If it ain't broke don't fix it."
+1 to this! I'd wait for Win11 to "stabilize" and "settle down" and only then will I "consider" an upgrade from Win10 which tbh I'm quite happy with.
 

Kannan

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Mine was not supported, but ofcourse there was a way around it, but I ended up with several driver compatibility issues which would have needed elaborate trial and error testing to get everything working. Just did not have the patience.
As I tried it on a spare hard disk, I just had to switch the hard drives to get back to Win. 10
 

DB1989

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Hi all,
PC's been prompting for a long time.
Anyone tried it?
What are the big pros and cons you have noticed?
Most important, how does it behave with slightly older hardware? (Mine's a three-year-old i7 intel that's been doing really well so far)
Any inputs and observations most welcome.
Regards
The short answer is - No.

I haven't noticed any pros so far. Right off the bat though, one of the cons is the extra step required to access even simple menus including sound on the taskbar (which has been grouped with wireless and battery for no apparent reason) and the most egregious of them all, the right click menu. Why do you have to have an extra step to access all the usual right click menu suspects? Its unnecessary and infuriating.

I lean more towards convenience and usability over outright performance (IF the latter is indeed provided by Win11) and that applies to all my devices and cars. If it's not user friendly, i usually find it relegated to the store room no matter the "better" performance.

Back on topic, boot times are more or less the same as my 2016 core i7 (4th gen 4720HQ) laptop with windows 10, just a tad faster perhaps due to the NVMe SSD on the Windows 11 laptop and being newer(even computer components suffer from wear and tear due to heat and dust - try cleaning the interiors of your old laptop to give it a new lease of life and extract extra FPS during games). But honestly, a 3-4 second difference for bootup which i perform once a week hardly makes a difference (or for that matter, even if you bootup 10 times a day).

But most gains to be had vis-a-vis bootup times is by upgrading the storage. For reference, my windows 11 laptop has a Ryzen 7 5700u, 16gb ram and a 1TB NVMe SSD.

I don't find it to be any faster for daily tasks than my 6 year old windows 10 laptop which is outfitted with the aforementioned i7 4720HQ, a Samsung Evo 850 and 8gb ram.
 
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Kannan

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Went from windows 10 to windows 11 on my Dell XPS 9570, use it mostly for some editing work at home on photoshop and the amount of bugs it had for photoshop made me go back to windows 10 in a flash, am gonna wait for a long time before i change over
With Windows 11 Microsoft has taken a clean-up route like Apple OS with considerably reduced support for older hardware, and I doubt if companies will support with compatible drivers for laptops and hardware accessories older than 3/4 years.

So my suggestion is jump to Win 10 only if it comes clean with compatibility test and before that check support if you are using any older version of softwares.
 

OM_2K19

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Hi all,
PC's been prompting for a long time.
Anyone tried it?
What are the big pros and cons you have noticed?
Most important, how does it behave with slightly older hardware? (Mine's a three-year-old i7 intel that's been doing really well so far)
Any inputs and observations most welcome.
Regards
I was one of the Early Adopters of Windows 11, and I have been using it on my secondary machine for some time. Before upgrading to Windows 11, Microsoft evaluates your hardware like the presence of TPM 2.0, which is one of the prerequisites. It is pretty stable as of now, but some rough edges/3rd party compatibility issues still need to be ironed out. If you use software like VMWare Workstation, let it pass; there are significant compatibility issues.

There is a noticeable improvement in audio playback, HDR rendering, and gameplay from an AV perspective. My suggestions will be to use the Microsoft compatibility tool first to ensure your machine qualifies for Windows 11 and then probably wait for another 4/6 months before they address all the issues.
 

k-pad

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it
First question is do you have a desktop or laptop?
It's an AIO.
I have upgraded on my Acer Nitro 5, which is 8gb ram, i5 and 1060ti GPU with SSD. But for some reason after the update 5ghz wifi has been glitchy and not able to connect. I have tried all possible methods and it keeps failing. This machine is used for downloading stuff and it is painful using 30mbps after getting used to 100mbps.

I have 3 laptops I use,
Acer Nitro 5 - personnel laptop
HP Elitebook with i7 16gb 1tb ssd - work laptop
HP pavilion g6 with 4gb and 1tb - used as server

Though boot times are super fast on Windows 11, 2-5secs I assume, but I am going back to Windows 10 on Acer Nitro and won't update other laptops due to the wifi glitch.
It may happen to certain devices, not all are affected.

I would suggest wait, if it ain't broken why fix it?
Yup, will do that.
Thanks, mate.

The short answer is - No.

I haven't noticed any pros so far. Right off the bat though, one of the cons is the extra step required to access even simple menus including sound on the taskbar (which has been grouped with wireless and battery for no apparent reason) and the most egregious of them all, the right click menu. Why do you have to have an extra step to access all the usual right click menu suspects? Its unnecessary and infuriating.

I lean more towards convenience and usability over outright performance (IF the latter is indeed provided by Win11) and that applies to all my devices and cars. If it's not user friendly, i usually find it relegated to the store room no matter the "better" performance.

Back on topic, boot times are more or less the same as my 2016 core i7 (4th gen 4720HQ) laptop with windows 10, just a tad faster perhaps due to the NVMe SSD on the Windows 11 laptop and being newer(even computer components suffer from wear and tear due to heat and dust - try cleaning the interiors of your old laptop to give it a new lease of life and extract extra FPS during games). But honestly, a 3-4 second difference for bootup which i perform once a week hardly makes a difference (or for that matter, even if you bootup 10 times a day).

But most gains to be had vis-a-vis bootup times is by upgrading the storage. For reference, my windows 11 laptop has a Ryzen 7 5700u, 16gb ram and a 1TB NVMe SSD.

I don't find it to be any faster for daily tasks than my 6 year old windows 10 laptop which is outfitted with the aforementioned i7 4720HQ, a Samsung Evo 850 and 8gb ram.
Thank you, DB for the detailed breakdown.
This sounds like all cons and virtually no gains.
 

Decadent_Spectre

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Some spiffiness.
To be sure, my comp's quite agile, but I feel it should not be as sluggish as it is.
I suspect the problem lies elsewhere.
But just wanted to be sure.
Point of the question was to check if 11 gels well with existing hardware.
@efernand1's eight-second boot was something I used to have three years ago.
But it's got sluggish with age.

On the contrary, in my experience, the time between 7 and before XP was the worst as a PC user.
XP onwards, I think the fixes came much faster.


That's a good path. Makes sense, yes.

Agree.

Of course. Like another FM said in another thread (which I myself follow for my android updates) nothing wrong in being n+1 :)

But, here, I just wanted to hear the experiences of FMs who have updated 10 to 11.

@efernand1 has given a part of the story (two devices)
But would be nice if FMs who have upgraded from 10 to 11 with old hardware also give their opinion.

Perhaps it is a software problem, as in too many start up programs, too many programs running at the same time, maybe malware/viruses etc. You should rule these out if your system was faster before and is slower now. I would investigate the current windows install for issues, a new install of Windows 11 would solve this as it would be a fresh install but so would a fresh install of 10.

What I mean was that upto XP I would update windows immediately as it became available and after XP I would always wait till it was user tested.

As for hardware it would be best to read Microsoft's literature, run the compatibility tool as suggested and read user reviews on tech forums. Perhaps even tech websites/reviews.
 

Chulbulee

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I started with "DOS", then came the more efficient "DR DOS". Minimal OS (around 200kb) and worked best. Simply type

Print filename.ext lpt1:/b

and it would print, flawlessly.

Today's Windows keep giving errors for no obvious reasons.

I have my old Dell Latitude e5410 and it has Xp, Vista, 7, 10, 11 & Linux. The other day I wanted to print a Word file, tried all but failed, only Xp printed the file: same port, no problems. This is on my SSD. On my HDD of 340Gb, I have around 3 Windows 7 and 2 of 10. IMO, with every new version, Windows has degraded itself. Unnecessary layout changes (whereas all the submenus are unchanged since Xp).

I had to literally discard many bluetooth, wireless accessories just because Windows could not pair them. Same with pen drives, the unnecessary tinkering with drivers, made every update a nightmare. I just wished I had a pre-configured Linux and would have happily lived ... (but for those stupid (IMO) Linux fellas who could never come up with a pliable version.
 

shibashis

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All running apps clumped together on the taskbar, without a label, how does that sound when you have to work with 10 or 12 open windows all the time? No drag and drop onto the task bar, sounds even better! Absolutely no reason to have an extremely convoluted audio panel menu, sounds heavenly!
That is Windows 11 for you. It is a productivity killer, that is what it does best. I am not touching it with even a single bit of my internet bandwidth for another couple of years at least.
 

superczar

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Some spiffiness.
To be sure, my comp's quite agile, but I feel it should not be as sluggish as it is.
I suspect the problem lies elsewhere.
But just wanted to be sure.
Point of the question was to check if 11 gels well with existing hardware.
@efernand1's eight-second boot was something I used to have three years ago.
But it's got sluggish with age.

On the contrary, in my experience, the time between 7 and before XP was the worst as a PC user.
XP onwards, I think the fixes came much faster.


That's a good path. Makes sense, yes.

Agree.

Of course. Like another FM said in another thread (which I myself follow for my android updates) nothing wrong in being n+1 :)

But, here, I just wanted to hear the experiences of FMs who have updated 10 to 11.

@efernand1 has given a part of the story (two devices)
But would be nice if FMs who have upgraded from 10 to 11 with old hardware also give their opinion.
If your PC takes over a minute to boot win 10, I would be almost certain that it uses an old school spin drive.
If that;s the case, Win 11 will be more trouble than it’s worth on that.

Most newer OSes (last few gens on mac os and 11 for windows) use HDD I/O a lot more than what was the norm some years ago
The signifiacntly slow Read/write speeds on traditional drives does not go well with it..

For win 11, you should preferably use a machine with a nvme ssd or at least a sata ssd - but a sata spin would be a big reason not to go that route
 

k-pad

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If your PC takes over a minute to boot win 10, I would be almost certain that it uses an old school spin drive.
If that;s the case, Win 11 will be more trouble than it’s worth on that.

Most newer OSes (last few gens on mac os and 11 for windows) use HDD I/O a lot more than what was the norm some years ago
The signifiacntly slow Read/write speeds on traditional drives does not go well with it..

For win 11, you should preferably use a machine with a nvme ssd or at least a sata ssd - but a sata spin would be a big reason not to go that route
You are right.
Mine's actually an SSD drive, but got a black screen very eary on.

Lenovo fixed it remotely, but from what I remember, they made boot/os as an hdd partition.

I was relieved then to have had the problem fixed.

I think if I could redo the boot/os to ssd, my fan noise problem (mentioned in another thread) will be mitigated to a large extent.

Thing is am very reluctant to tinker now. It's just some kind of tedium i guess.
But will get to it one day. Hopefully soon.

Thanks for the insight, Czar. Actually reminded me of a real issue I need to get down to fixing. :)
 
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