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JBL 560P plugged into 220v socket :(

Audiolab 6000A Amplifier

the_jaguar

Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2015
Messages
31
Points
8
Location
Bangalore
I bought my 560P in the US and had it shipped to India (as part of us relocating back to India). I have just setup a dedicated HT room and I had asked the installers not to plug anything into the wall socket unless it's confirmed to work on 220v, but when I had stepped out for a second, one of the guys plugged my sub into the wall socket directly :(

I unplugged it immediately and put in my heavy duty step-down transformer and tried powering it up again, but the led behind the sub didn't light up. After months of Harman India trying to fix it (6 months!), they are now telling me that since the 560P is being sunsetted, they are not able to find a replacement motherboard to fix it.

I just moved back to India after 16+ years in the US, so my knowledge of the local scene is minimal. Can you folks please suggest a few good shops that I can check with for repairs in Bangalore?

PS: crossposting this on the DIY forum based on the recommendation from another member.
 

danielnaveen2003

Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2010
Messages
213
Points
43
Location
Bangalore
I bought my 560P in the US and had it shipped to India (as part of us relocating back to India). I have just setup a dedicated HT room and I had asked the installers not to plug anything into the wall socket unless it's confirmed to work on 220v, but when I had stepped out for a second, one of the guys plugged my sub into the wall socket directly :(

I unplugged it immediately and put in my heavy duty step-down transformer and tried powering it up again, but the led behind the sub didn't light up. After months of Harman India trying to fix it (6 months!), they are now telling me that since the 560P is being sunsetted, they are not able to find a replacement motherboard to fix it.

I just moved back to India after 16+ years in the US, so my knowledge of the local scene is minimal. Can you folks please suggest a few good shops that I can check with for repairs in Bangalore?

PS: crossposting this on the DIY forum based on the recommendation from another member.

I used a place called Hi tech service point in koramangala last year to service a few amps that suffered voltage surges. You could try them.
 

reubensm

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 26, 2010
Messages
4,973
Points
113
Location
Trivandrum, India
When you plug a 110v piece of equipment into a 220v socket, the only component likely to blow is the power transformer. If you can't get a replacement spare, this can be rewound but a tech will have to take a look first.
 

somakmaitra

Active Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2009
Messages
106
Points
28
Location
kolkata
Hi,
Please get the service manual and check.
In case the power supply is affected change the affeted parts. If the transformer has got toasted replace it with the rated volt and amp.
Else you can buy a plate amp from partsexpress.

regards,
Somak
 

HormusPeston

Active Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2015
Messages
102
Points
28
Location
Poona
Hello Jaguar,
It might not be the power transformer. These take a while to self-destruct and can survive far longer than the minute or so you were away. Also, when they do blow, you would know immediately! I was unable to read the low-resolution schematic, but it looks like the amplifier has a capacitance multiplier as its power supply. The fault could simply be (1) the capacitors before the multiplier (2) if (1) is blown, the transistor or the zeners in the main power supply are likely damaged too, (3) a blown regulator IC on the secondary power supply, if it is used to engage a relay that activates the primary power supply. Finding the fault would be trivial for the enthusiasts on this forum who live in Bangalore -- offer some fiery, liquid refreshment, perhaps, and you might find a volunteer. Best of luck,
Cheers,
~HP
 

the_jaguar

Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2015
Messages
31
Points
8
Location
Bangalore
Hello Jaguar,
It might not be the power transformer. These take a while to self-destruct and can survive far longer than the minute or so you were away. Also, when they do blow, you would know immediately! I was unable to read the low-resolution schematic, but it looks like the amplifier has a capacitance multiplier as its power supply. The fault could simply be (1) the capacitors before the multiplier (2) if (1) is blown, the transistor or the zeners in the main power supply are likely damaged too, (3) a blown regulator IC on the secondary power supply, if it is used to engage a relay that activates the primary power supply. Finding the fault would be trivial for the enthusiasts on this forum who live in Bangalore -- offer some fiery, liquid refreshment, perhaps, and you might find a volunteer. Best of luck,
Cheers,
~HP
Thanks, HP - this is extremely helpful and to be honest, some of things you have mentioned are a bit beyond my comprehension. It goes without saying that not only will there be great scotch (and other alcoholic and non-alcoholic refreshments), but there will be yummy food too. I also have a vast array of movies (have ripped my UHD collection and 3D collection on to my NAS) that we can enjoy. My HT setup is a 7.1.4 system (Denon X4300H with JBL 590 fronts, 520C center, the rest of the speakers are all from RSL including the 4 in-ceiling atmos speakers) with a 110 inch screen with 6 recliners in a dedicated room in the basement.

I would really be grateful if somebody from Bangalore would be willing to come take a look and help out.
 

Aniket

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2013
Messages
252
Points
63
Location
Delhi
When you plug a 110v piece of equipment into a 220v socket, the only component likely to blow is the power transformer. If you can't get a replacement spare, this can be rewound but a tech will have to take a look first.

that's the last possible thing to get destroyed

Hi,
Please get the service manual and check.

regards,
Somak

you may write to JBL to provide the service manual for this model. most probably it has a Class D amp with SMPS.
they have a small NTC for inrush current limit and a 5-6 A fuse for safety. check these components if you understand basic electronics.

BTW, a friend of mine did the same thing to his Harman Kardon sub. plugged in directly to 230V AC and blew the SMPS. it blew the NTC, fuse and bridge rectifier. I replaced all these along with the main filter caps. worked perfectly.


Regards,
Aniket
 
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