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Why people still using Turntables

AV Cables
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Sep 9, 2009
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Hello,
I can see many people are still using Turntables and vinyls. I have no idea about these equipments (I have seen a gramaphone record player during the 80s) that was the end of it.

What special u can get in Vinyl? are they magnetic recorders? Will they get fungii in high humid places? I guess there is a great chances of noise as time , temp and dust increases??

And do we need to change the so called 'needle' everytime?

Interested to see expert comments on this.
 

hemantwaghe

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issue is discussed to death.why don't you browse the forum , have some conclusions and ask informed questions later? in act same question was asked in past??
 

Hiten

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Listen to a good clean vinyl record of your favourite artist/song on decent quality turntable, you will find the answer :)
artworks-000000567537-yd7hoq-crop.jpg
 

pksnathan

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I listen to vinyl records to cherish memories of yesteryears particularly 60'sand 70's.Personally it is a sheer pleasure for me to listen to music of an another time.
Sincerely,
pksnathan
 
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thanks for the replies. I havnt heard a Vinyl in my life (except when I was a small Kid.). Any body in Bangalore is willing to give me a friendly audition? :)
 

Hiten

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Hi anandkrishnan
Did you listen to any vinyls ? if yes, do post your views on it as yours will be a neutral opinion about sound of vinyl. :)
regards
Hiten
 

raslibi

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Hi,
With a reasonably good quality Magnetic Catridge Turn Table and a simple amplifier and decent 2 way speaker system the Vinyls pumpout amazing music
which has to be heard to be believed. I still use my technics direct drive turntable/shure magnetic cartridge fitted with diamond tipped eliptical stylus and my own DIY 100 Watts+100 Watts RMS amp and again my own 3 way speaker system. The number " Rivers of Babylon " by BoneyM played in the above system is awesom and todays digital format cannot match those Vinyls thats for sure.
Raslibi.
 

malvai

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Hi,
With a reasonably good quality Magnetic Catridge Turn Table and a simple amplifier and decent 2 way speaker system the Vinyls pumpout amazing music
which has to be heard to be believed. I still use my technics direct drive turntable/shure magnetic cartridge fitted with diamond tipped eliptical stylus and my own DIY 100 Watts+100 Watts RMS amp and again my own 3 way speaker system. The number " Rivers of Babylon " by BoneyM played in the above system is awesom and todays digital format cannot match those Vinyls thats for sure.
Raslibi.

I second that buddy! Last year I re-discovered my dad's 30 year old Tecnics SL 1300 Mk1 Turntable.
Just changed the cartridge and started playing it on a vintage AR 06 amp. Man, the sound gives many a big name combo a real run for its money.

Hear music on a half decent TT, and NO ONE would start such a thread! :eek:hyeah:
 

Murali Bhanu

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Simple answer to this simple question of why people still use Turntables. Better sound quality if you have the right match of Amp/Speakers, even when compared to the best digital source!
 

denzong

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Nothing Anand except that they want to utilise their well spent money.;)

and hard to find songsin full joy of yesteryears:p

i do not agree to this
i started towards the beginning of this year and have loved it ever since. although the sound was introduced to me by my dad but that does not mean that i am using his spent

if you love the richness in your music then vinyl is for your consumption. i use both digital as well as vinyl extensively so i know what i am talking about
 

echo77

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I am not a vinyl junkie and also used to wonder why... so, one layman explaining to another:

Vinyl contains the pure sine wave of an original analog recording (think studios and master tape). All digital copies are stepped sine waves, so they lose or distort some information. Digital quality depends on the analog-to-digital conversion of master tapes to CD/DVD.

What sounds better is based on your setup and your ears - whether you can distinguish between the two.

The disadvantage of vinyl is that being mechanical devices, they can distort over time, dust can cause added sounds etc. A digital file copy will never degrade.

~

I think most modern audio is digitally recorded using computers rather than old analog studios that had huge multichannel boxes with hundreds of knobs and sliders. The computers at work at such digital recording studios must be using algorithms at much higher bit rates so that a pure sine wave is generated than a stepped one.
 
Last edited:

marantzcdfan

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its simple:

1) for some, vinyl is what they get into because they grew up listening to it and want to relive those days
2) for some, its the quality of analogue music which they crave for
3) for some, its an audiophile style-statement
4) for some, they just want to have all the audio sources available, on their rack
5) for some, its the older titles one gets which are not available on CD
6) for some, its just a matter of inheritance, get it off your dad
7) and for some, its just for the sake of pure love for the format
 

avidyarthy

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its simple:

3) for some, vinyl is what they get into because they grew up listening to it and want to relive those days
4) for some, its the quality of analogue music which they crave for
2) for some, they just want to have all the audio sources available, on their rack
1) for some, its just a matter of inheritance, got it off your dad

Above 'four' apply to me .... in the order mentioned .... :)
 

jls001

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Vinyl contains the pure sine wave of an original analog recording (think studios and master tape). All digital copies are stepped sine waves, so they lose or distort some information. Digital quality depends on the analog-to-digital conversion of master tapes to CD/DVD.

Good analogy there, although a bit inaccurate. Analog recording is a complete record of the recorded event, in as much as the physical and electrical limitations of the sound producing device and, subsequently, the recording device, allows. To explain what is meant by those limitations, let's say the sum of music produced by a band in a recording studio is M. They use cables, microphones, pre-amplifiers, amplifiers, mixers, etc all of which take away something and add something from/to M. So we have [M - x], which is recorded by a recording device. The recording device is not perfect so it also subtracts and adds its own things, say, y. So you have [M - (x + y)]. Assuming [M - (x + y)] is what gets burned to CD/LP, your playback system will invariably add/subtract to/from the music and therefore what you hear is [M - (x + y + z)].

Music in most forms is not pure sine wave. A pure sine wave is very boring and piercing to listen to (and so used for calibrating equipments and audio-video transmission links). Music is a combination of lots of harmonics.

A digital recording is a sample of the recorded event, sampled 44100 times every second or Hertz (in case of CD recording).


I think most modern audio is digitally recorded using computers rather than old analog studios that had huge multichannel boxes with hundreds of knobs and sliders. The computers at work at such digital recording studios must be using algorithms at much higher bit rates so that a pure sine wave is generated than a stepped one.

As explained above, no matter how high the sampling rate, a sampled signal is always a subset of the original signal. "Pure sine wave" will not be generated even if the computer is very powerful or fast. Yes, the filtering algorithms can smooth out the waveform to closely approximate the original recorded event. So higher sampling rate is always better while recording.
 
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