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Isolating the floorstanders from the floor

Audiolab 6000CDT Dedicated CD Transport

vivekkumar

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Hey everybody,
I'm using Aviano 6 as FS with Yamaha 671, in a room measuring about 14 ft by 20 ft. I got a granite slab cut to the size and shape of the FS base and 4 depressions for the spikes. I want to ask the experts whether there is need for a buffering rubber or compressed foam sheet between the granite slab and the floor. Also is there any need to do this under the sub too?
I plan to put a small light in between the FS and the granite slab, for which i have got a 3" hole in the centre of the slab. Any suggestions for which kind of light will be suitable, and will the power supply to this light interfere with the speaker performance.
 
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navin advani

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Hey everybody,
I'm using Aviano 6 as FS with Yamaha 671, in a room measuring about 14 ft by 20 ft. I got a granite slab cut to the size and shape of the FS base and 4 depressions for the spikes. I want to ask the experts whether there is need for a buffering rubber or compressed foam sheet between the granite slab and the floor. Also is there any need to do this under the sub too?
I plan to put a small light in between the FS and the granite slab, for which i have got a 3" hole in the centre of the slab. Any suggestions for which kind of light will be suitable, and will the power supply to this light interfere with the speaker performance.

Our floor is marble and my wife did not want spikes to damage the marble so I put the speakers a 30mm wooden plinth (your idea of using a granite plinth might be better) and about 2" of sand below the plinth The sand is contained in a 5 sided box with the plinth being the 6th side. The weight of the speakers keeps the sand compressed.
 

soulforged

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You can get some 'tender feet' or make some to put under the spikes. Or simply put some 50p coins under the spikes. They would work. I for one don't think you should go for spikes on granite. On wood they make sense but on marble or granite, they can actually interfere with the sound. You can also feel your speaker vibrate more and if you listen to bass-heavy music, it might move a bit too!!! You can avoid that by placing a granite, stone slab on top of the speaker (that's what I had done) or if your speaker allows, fill it with sand.
 

vivekkumar

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Thanks Soulforged,
The FS came with something like coins to put under the spikes. They are comparable to 4mm thick Re.5 coins with a small dimple in the center for the spikes. These coins ( if I may call them that ) I have fixed in the depressions in the granite slab. so truly speaking the spikes are not directly in touch with the stone slab. Is that okay? Will check out the vibrating issue and post the results. Thanks again
 

alpha1

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Isolation means the vibrations of the speakers are not directly transferred to the ground.
This will happen if you put in a compressible material like rubber.

Coupling means direct transfer for all vibrations from speakers to the ground.
This happens via non compressible material. (like metallic spikes)

Looking at the post, the thread topic should be coupling, not isolation.
 

navin advani

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You can avoid that by placing a granite, stone slab on top of the speaker (that's what I had done) or if your speaker allows, fill it with sand.

Filling the speaker with sand. I have heard of sand in speaker stands but not in the speake themselves.

Although I can see how they can help (convert kinetic energy into heat) I cant see how to implement it so that the sand does not get into the magnet/coil gap.

Many years ago (late 80s) Pro-Kennex (they were called just Kennex then) came up with the idea of using small balls to absorb energy in their tennis racquets.

ProKennex Kinetic Technology

Isolation means the vibrations of the speakers are not directly transferred to the ground.

That's waht I thought too. Hence my earlier post was about isolation.
 

Teja

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Isolation means the vibrations of the speakers are not directly transferred to the ground. This will happen if you put in a compressible material like rubber.
+1
You need a damping material to isolate. A sheet of rubber matting, a 12mm thick plywood piece on it and your FS' spikes on the plywood would do a good job of isolating the speaker from the floor.
 

vivekkumar

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Isolation means the vibrations of the speakers are not directly transferred to the ground.
This will happen if you put in a compressible material like rubber.

Coupling means direct transfer for all vibrations from speakers to the ground.
This happens via non compressible material. (like metallic spikes)

Looking at the post, the thread topic should be coupling, not isolation.

thanks alpha1 , so what is good, i mean what will result in better sound....coupling or isolation? The granite slabs are looking great so i think i'll put a rubber sheet under them if that works, since the spikes are already in place between the granite and the speakers.....what say??
 

alpha1

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The more mass you have, the more inertia, and thus more pure vibrations from the speakers. Here is how:

Your speakers are coupled to the speaker baffle/body, the body is coupled to the spike, and spikes coupled to the ground.
When there is a vibration in the speaker cone - only the cone vibrates. Thus producing a more powerful and accurate sound.

In case of isolation, when the speaker moves, the rest of the speaker body moves in opposite direction. (This is the law of conservation of momentum).

So when do you isolate?
When you want to damp the vibrations.
Perhaps to reduce the bass ...
But In my opinion, you would never come across such a situation.

So in your case, if you have already put in the spikes on the granite floor.
Just let it be - if you are concerned about spikes ruining the floor - put something real hard between the spikes and the floor.
 
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