Connecting NAD C388 integrated amp to high level inputs on JL Audio E110 Sub

Home Theatre Systems

Amitdubey

Active Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2020
Messages
114
Points
28
Location
India
While I would have preferred to have a crossover defeat function, the slope does not look steep enough to create problems. You could try it out and see for yourself if it makes a difference.

Edit: He says, set the crossover switch to off. This is exactly what a crossover defeat is. You should be fine with this setting.

In your place, I would still use the front speakers at full range and crossover the sub at 60. :)
Agree with this.
1)Just have speakers at full range and set crossover on sub starting at 60 and looking to go down ever so slightly as required
2) Remeber to match vume levels between speakers and sub. Lot of free apps available
3) Most important tip: Crossover and level on the sub are inversely proportional. The lower you set your crossover, the higher you can set your level to match your speakers and integrate better. The higher the crossover, the lower the volume on sub will have to be which is not what you are looking for.
4) The mids on speakers don't improve because of speaker or high level connection with the sub by the signal going to both the sub and speaker and having a overlap and creating a mid centric sound. No! If you let the sub manage the low frequencies, the amplifier focusses on rest of the frequencies adding weight to the mids and highs and thus people report about more energy in highs and mids after adding a sub to an amp which has bass management especially.

Happy for your acquisition. All the very best.
 

DB1989

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2020
Messages
1,146
Points
113
Location
New Delhi
Simply blown away with JLs quick responses and the extensive technical insights they provide.

4) The mids on speakers don't improve because of speaker or high level connection with the sub by the signal going to both the sub and speaker and having a overlap and creating a mid centric sound. No! If you let the sub manage the low frequencies, the amplifier focusses on rest of the frequencies adding weight to the mids and highs and thus people report about more energy in highs and mids after adding a sub to an amp which has bass management especially.
Isnt that true only for AVRs and amps in which you can set a low pass filter? Otherwise, the signal going to the speakers would be full range, no matter whether a sub is hooked up with a high level connection or not.
 

Amitdubey

Active Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2020
Messages
114
Points
28
Location
India
Simply blown away with JLs quick responses and the extensive technical insights they provide.


Isnt that true only for AVRs and amps in which you can set a low pass filter? Otherwise, the signal going to the speakers would be full range, no matter whether a sub is hooked up with a high level connection or not.
Yes that's true only on avrs and handful of two channel amps with bass management functionality
 

shyamv

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2011
Messages
355
Points
93
Location
Bangalore
By plugging the ports (assuming you did it correctly) the system transforms into a sealed system. This means that now the low end extension point of the speaker has shifted up significantly in frequency as the port is no longer providing its native extension, this also means the systems previous output near tune is gone as it has become a sealed system, however this also means that the speaker has a much better time domain response to provide better integration and "speed". The subwoofer will now be the major contributor of sound to a higher frequency, this may or may not sound better than the speaker but the subwoofer may become directional if it plays too high. Do keep in mind that as a sealed system the drivers of the speaker covering the lower end of the spectrum will see greater excursion and heating if the speaker attempts to play too loud and too low.

Thanks for the explanation. Wouldn't plugging the reflex ports, of a speaker not designed to function as a sealed system, reduce it's coherence? This may impact not just it's base extension but also mid range frequencies.

Sorry OP for the digression.
 

Decadent_Spectre

Active Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2010
Messages
543
Points
43
Location
India
Thanks for the explanation. Wouldn't plugging the reflex ports, of a speaker not designed to function as a sealed system, reduce it's coherence? This may impact not just it's base extension but also mid range frequencies.

Sorry OP for the digression.

Based on the data I have seen plugging the port of ported system makes it have less issues in both frequency and time. The designer may have tried to incorporate the flaws of the port into the system so making it sealed would not function as the designer intended. IMO plugging the port, all else equal, will make the system sound faster and cleaner but thinner and weaker overall. It probably will not affect the mid range much if it really is tuned around 50Hz. If anything you might feel its cleaner because of the lower bass/midbass and less time domain issues.
 
Joined
Mar 31, 2021
Messages
51
Points
8
Location
Delhi
By plugging the ports (assuming you did it correctly) the system transforms into a sealed system. This means that now the low end extension point of the speaker has shifted up significantly in frequency as the port is no longer providing its native extension, this also means the systems previous output near tune is gone as it has become a sealed system, however this also means that the speaker has a much better time domain response to provide better integration and "speed". The subwoofer will now be the major contributor of sound to a higher frequency, this may or may not sound better than the speaker but the subwoofer may become directional if it plays too high. Do keep in mind that as a sealed system the drivers of the speaker covering the lower end of the spectrum will see greater excursion and heating if the speaker attempts to play too loud and too low.
Thanks mate!
I don't think I'll be sealing the ports anyway. Doesn't sound like a good idea to me.
I'll give both the options a try and let you know what sounds better.
I am inclined towards your opinion to be honest.
 

Decadent_Spectre

Active Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2010
Messages
543
Points
43
Location
India
Try both out, best way to see for yourself. If you lack speed and clarity then sealing the ports will do that at the cost of volume and weight. Personally I would not seal it if I had those speakers because they would already be too low on volume and lacking weight for my tastes. I think you might prefer with the ports open.
 

alphacentury100

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2011
Messages
624
Points
63
Location
chennai
Thanks mate!
I don't think I'll be sealing the ports anyway. Doesn't sound like a good idea to me.
I'll give both the options a try and let you know what sounds better.
I am inclined towards your opinion to be honest.
Sealing a ported speaker is recommended only in rare occasions where the speaker sound boomy and if sealing solves the boominess. Otherwise it is better to keep the speakers ported.
Except the REL brand, almost all the other brands recommend their subwoofers to be connected through through a Low-Level_Sub output, and as the JL tech tech team have recommended, it is better to connect your JL to the Preout(subout-Lowlevel) signal.
 

DB1989

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2020
Messages
1,146
Points
113
Location
New Delhi
Sealing a ported speaker is recommended only in rare occasions where the speaker sound boomy and if sealing solves the boominess. Otherwise it is better to keep the speakers ported.
Except the REL brand, almost all the other brands recommend their subwoofers to be connected through through a Low-Level_Sub output, and as the JL tech tech team have recommended, it is better to connect your JL to the Preout(subout-Lowlevel) signal.
the point is moot. The JL E110 is a sealed sub and does not have high level inputs.
 
Top