IPS vs VA Panels on TVs (Brands, Series, Models) in India?

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crashnburn

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1611223796369.png

* I am hence more inclined towards the IPS pros as I will be keeping it at 4/5/6 feet for 4K UHD @100%
* (Currently testing 43 4K at 3/4 feet - this will mostly be 50/55 4K a bit further using a reclining kind of seating). -
* That means with distance the VERTICAL Viewing Angle will also DEFINITELY have changed & maybe the Horizontal as well.


This thread is not to debate, but hope to sort between the IPS vs VA panels on TVs in India in terms of COLOR & MAINLY VIEWING ANGLES.
Gaming is not a PRIORITY so VA with greater refresh Hz is not key.

Please dont give theory, share actual examples if you have any or SIMILAR VIDEOS. But only if its detailed & in depth.

Help me find the IPS TVs. If you know or recall of them.

I will be using this primarily as a big monitor for "reclined computing" at a distance (NOT upclose as shown here).
1611222959033.png

I am aware of RTings and other technical reviews of VA having greater blacks and IPS having better color & view angles.
 
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crashnburn

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@lightgamer - now leave the Dream WiFi :p and come help me find some IPS TVs here :D :p

And please tag some other members who you think might be able to help find these.. or may know.

IPS Panels & their variants naming by various Manufacturers:

TN panel vs IPS panel (PLS, AMVA , AH-IPS, etc.) vs PVA panel (S-PVA, SVA) vs VA panel (MVA, S-MVA, AMVA) review​

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What are the types of LED screens in monitors and TVs

In the monitor is installed screens manufactured by different technologies, the following types of matrices TN, IPS, VA with various modifications. In the figure below you can see how the picture on the different screens when viewing at an angle.
IPS  TN

TN (TN+film) panel

TN+film – first TFT panel, if available now as inexpensive screens advantage of low cost production. Lack of small viewing angles, reducing the brightness and contrast when viewed from the side. First there were TN screens then was added a special layer to improve the color and kind of filter screens became known as TN + film

IPS panel

list of panels manufactured by IPS technology. Panel name by manufacturer
  • IPS Generations Summary (Hitachi)
  • PLS – Plane to Line Switching (Samsung)
  • AD-PLS – Advanced PLS (Samsung)
  • S-IPS – Super IPS (NEC, LG.Display)
  • E-IPS, AS-IPS – Enhanced and Advanced Super IPS (Hitachi)
  • H-IPS – Horizontal IPS (LG.Display)
  • e-IPS (LG.Display)
  • UH-IPS и H2-IPS (LG.Display)
  • S-IPS II (LG.Display)
  • p-IPS – Performance IPS (NEC)
  • AH-IPS – Advanced High Performance IPS (LG.Display)
  • AHVA – Advanced Hyper-Viewing Angle (AU Optronics)

Panel Type IPS (IPS, PLS, AD-PLS, S-IPS, S-IPS II, E-IPS, AS-IPS, H-IPS, e-IPS, UH-IPS, H2-IPS, p-IPS, AH-IPS, AHVA

  • IPS – Production technology TFT screens, was invented in 1996 (Hitachi) as an alternative to TN displays, has wide viewing angles, deeper black color, good color, the lack of a large response time, which makes them not suitable for games.
  • PLS– (Plane-к-Line Switching) Samsung
    • response time of 4 ms (GTG). GTG is the time to change the brightness of the pixel with the minimum brightness to the maximum.
    • Wide viewing angles without loss of picture brightness.
    • The increased brightness of the display
  • AD-PLS – The same panel PLS but says samsung slightly modified production technology, as many experts say, it’s just advertising.
  • S-IPS – IPS technology improved in the direction of the development is carried out (NEC) A-SFT, A-AFT, SA-SFT, SA-AFT, and LG.Display (S-IPS, e-IPS, H-IPS, p-IPS) . Due to improvements in technology have achieved reduction of response time to 5 seconds a mile, making these displays are suitable for games.
  • S-IPS II -the next generation of S – IPS panels, reducing energy intensity.
  • E-IPS, AS-IPS – Enhanced and Advanced Super IPS, development (Hitachi) is one of the improvements IPS technology to increase brightness and decrease response time
  • H-IPS – Horizontal IPS, (LG.Display) This type of matrix pixels arranged horizontally. improved color reproduction and contrast. More than half of today’s IPS panel has a horizontal arrangement of pixels.
  • e-IPS(LG.Display) The following improvement of production matrix cheaper to produce but have the disadvantage slightly smaller viewing angles.
  • UH-IPS и H2-IPS – the second generation of H-IPS technology enhanced matrix to increase the brightness of the panel.
  • p-IPS – Performance IPS is the same as the H-IPS matrix marketing name from NEC.
  • AH-IPS – modification for high-resolution displays (UHD), analogue of H-IPS.
  • AHVA – Advanced Hyper-Viewing Angle such designation received displays companies (AU Optronics), the company formed from the merger of Acer Display Technology and units for the production of screens Corporation BenQ.

PVA – Patterned Vertical Alignment panel

  • S-PVA – Super PVA
  • cPVA
  • A-PVA – Advanced PVA
  • SVA
PVA matrix Samsung have been developed a good contrast, but have several disadvantages, the major loss of contrast when viewed at an angle. What would be periodically updated line of production, after a certain period of time there is a new model of the screen, so there are the following types of screens VA.

Panel PVA Type S-PVA, cPVA, A-PVA, SVA​

  • S-PVA – Super PVA Improved matrix by changing the production technology.
  • cPVA – simplified production technology on the quality of the screen is worse than S – PVA
  • A-PVA – Advanced PVA small absolutely no significant changes.
  • SVA– another modification.

VA – Vertical Alignment panel

  • MVA – Multi-Domain Vertical Alignment (Fujitsu)
  • P-MVA – Premium MVA
  • S-MVA – Super MVA
  • AMVA – Advanced MVA
Technology of production of TFT displays (VA) was developed in 1996 by Fujitsu as an alternative TN matrices screens produced by this technology have disadvantages as a large response time and small angles of view but had a much better color characteristics.

Panel Type VA (MVA, P-MVA, AMVA)​

  • MVA – the next version of the technology in 1998 difference was that the pixel consists of several parts, it is possible to achieve a high-quality image.
  • P-MVA, S-MVA – improved color reproduction and contrast.
  • AMVA –production of the next generation, reducing response time, improvement in transmission color.

Other panel manufacturers have their own ‘IPS-type’ technologies, including Innolux with their AAS (Azimuthal Anchoring Switch) technology – which, confusingly, also has VA-type iterations.

And BOE with their IPS-ADS technology.

The real selling point of these is their superior colour accuracy, consistency and viewing angles when compared to the other LCD technologies.


LCD Panel Types Explored​


Author: Adam Simmons
Last updated: November 3rd 2020

Table of Contents

Introduction​

Most people are familiar with the fact that monitors come in various resolutions and screen sizes, can have a matte or glossy screen surface and can offer specific features such as 120Hz refresh rates and 3D capabilities. The range of displays and variation in specification can be rather daunting and what’s more; you can’t necessarily trust the ‘on paper’ figures in the first place. One fundamentally important aspect of an LCD monitor which will dictate how it performs and what kind of tasks it would be best at performing is the panel type. Although there are various sub-divisions all modern screens will generally fall into one of three categories with distinct performance characteristics.

TN (Twisted Nematic) panels​

For several years now the TN panel monitor has been the most ubiquitous on the market. Manufacturers will often be keen to point out in their specifications whether an ‘alternative’ kind of panel is used; if in doubt assume its TN. General attributes include a relatively low manufacturing cost and a relatively high level of responsiveness; the pixels change their state quickly which helps make moving images appear smoother. Some Twisted Nematic displays have double the usual refresh rate (120Hz instead of 60Hz) allowing them to take advantage of ‘active 3D shutter’ technologies and allowing them to display twice as much information every second for a smoother gaming experience. This has gone further now, with more recent releases featuring a 144Hz or higher refresh rate and aiming this purely at a fluid 2D rather than 3D (stereoscopic glasses) experience.

The Acer XN253Q X – a 240Hz TN panel monitor

shadow-a.png

Although it has improved leaps and bounds in this department over the years the image performance is often considered a relative weakness of TN technology. A good TN monitor can provide a crisp and vibrant image with respectable contrast – typically 1000:1 with any ‘dynamic contrast’ mode disabled. The main drawback comes with relatively restricted viewing angles. These are often quoted as 170° horizontal and 160° vertical which is only marginally lower than that quoted for other panel technologies. In actuality you will see a marked change in colour and even ‘inversion’ if you view the screen from the side but also from above or below, in particular. You can see this shift demonstrated in the video below on what is regarded as one of the more capable TN monitors (the Dell S2719DGF).


Particularly but not exclusively on larger TN models, the relatively restricted viewing angles actually affect the performance if you are sitting directly in front as well. Your eyes subtend different viewing angles if you observe the centre of the screen compared to observing peripheral regions. You will see a given shade represented differently depending on its position on the screen – most notably being darker (more saturated and higher perceived gamma) towards the top of the screen and lighter (less saturated and lower perceived gamma) towards the bottom. Because of this, the colour accuracy and consistency suffers making them a poor choice for ‘colour critical work’ such as design and photography. You can see this in the image below, captured on the ASUS PG278Q in a way that is fairly representative of what you would see when observing the monitor from a normal viewing position at a desk.

Colour shift from a normal viewing position

The image below shows the Dell S2716DG, another TN model, displaying the Datacolor SpyderCHECKR 24 test patches. There is a printed sheet of shades, all of which are contained within the sRGB colour space. The screen is displaying a reference photograph of the printed shade board, provided by Datacolor. This should match the printed shade quite closely if the monitor is accurately outputting shades within the sRGB colour space. Although there is always some disparity between how emissive objects (monitor) and non-emissive objects (printed sheet) appear. The shades are displayed in the same order as the printed sheet on the right of the screen, whilst the order is inverted on the left side of the screen. Whilst the exact shades you see will differ from those you’d see in real life, due to the camera used and the screen you’re viewing this photo on, it still gives a good idea of the relative differences. It also provides a very clear visual demonstration of the colour consistency issues described earlier. The light chocolate brown shade and golden yellow (gamboge) shade next to it, for example, look far deeper when displayed near the top of the screen. The golden yellow shade is actually a fairly close match to the printed shade at this point. When displayed near the bottom, the brown shade appears far more clay-like. And the golden yellow a brighter yellow shade, more closely matching the other yellow shade on the printed sheet. The shades have what should be a very subtle texture to them due to the material they’re printed on. This is captured in the reference photographs and is most obvious for the black block. It’s brought out far too strongly when the shade is displayed lower down the screen and is much better-blended when it’s displayed further up the screen, due to the perceived gamma shifts.

SpyderCHEKR 24 on Dell S2716DG TN model

VA (Vertical Alignment) panels​

If an LCD monitor is trying to display black then the colour filter will be positioned such that as little light as possible (of any colour) from the backlight will get through. Most LCD monitors will do a reasonable job at this but the filter isn’t perfect and so the blacks may not appear as deep as they should. A definite strength of the VA panel is its efficiency at blocking light from the backlight when it’s not wanted. This gives deeper blacks and higher contrast ratios of around 2000:1 – 5000:1 with ‘dynamic contrast’ modes disabled – several times higher than that of the other LCD technologies. They are also less susceptible to ‘bleed’ or ‘clouding’ towards the edges of the screen, which can make such screens good candidates for movie lovers and nice to use for general purpose work. Such issues still can, unfortunately, still plague some units of any panel type.

The BenQ EW series – modern VA panel monitors

shadow-a.png

Another key advantage of VA is the improved viewing angles and colour reproduction compared to TN. The shift in colour across the screen and ‘off angle’ is less pronounced, whilst shades can be produced with greater precision. In this respect they are better candidates for colour critical work, but they are not as strong in this area as the IPS and related technologies explored subsequently. There is a weakening of saturation when comparing a shade in the centre of the screen vs. that same shade towards the edges or bottom of the screen, from a normal viewing angle. There is also a shift in gamma that is most noticeable on greys or pastel shades but can also be observed elsewhere, with said shade appearing to lighten or darken quite readily with even slight head movement. Some VA models almost have a ‘cone’ or ‘tunnel’ effect due to these shifts, with the peripheral regions appearing noticeably duller than the central mass of the screen. This also masks dark detail centrally (‘black crush’, high perceived gamma) and can reveal extra unintended detail peripherally (low perceived gamma). The image shows the same SpyderCHECKR 24 system used for the TN example earlier, this time on the AOC CQ27G2(U) with VA panel. The vertical shifts in saturation and colour representation are less extreme, but certainly still there.

SpyderCHECKR 24 on AOC CQ27G2U VA model

A common weakness with VA models is with their relatively low level of pixel responsiveness in places. Pixels transitioning from one state to another relatively slowly when certain shades are displayed – leading to more pronounced blurring during motion on the screen. In some severe cases things can appear to ‘smear’ into a smoke-like trail as demonstrated in the video below, taken on the AOC Q3279VWF. This is a fairly extreme example, some VA models (as we explore shortly) do not tend to exhibit this degree of pixel response time weakness.


Some of the modern VA panel types used on PC monitors include SVA (‘Super’ Vertical Alignment), MVA (Multi-domain Vertical Alignment) and AAS (Azimuthal Anchoring Switch) VA-type panels. Recent models using AU Optronics VA and Samsung SVA panels generally use effective pixel overdrive and don’t suffer from these extensive ‘smoke-like’ trails. They are actually on par with modern IPS models for some pixel transitions, which is something manufacturers will latch onto by giving misleading and overly optimistic specified response times. 4ms is commonly specified, as some pixel transitions can be expected to be performed at this kind of speed. Other pixel transitions, particularly where darker shades are involved in the transition, are still relatively slow. Enough to significantly increase perceived blur with some smeary-looking trailing – although not always to the extent demonstrated in the video above.
There has been an increasing drive towards high refresh rate VA panels, including 34″-35″ ‘UltraWide’ VA panels with 100Hz+ refresh rates and various sizes of screen with 144Hz+ 16:9 VA panels. Models such as the AOC C24G1 and LG 32GK850G employ effective and flexible pixel overdrive and can deliver a decent 144Hz – 165Hz experience. Users benefit from the decreased perceived blur of running the high refresh rate at suitably high frame rates, with many pixel transitions performed fast enough for a decent performance there. But there are still some weaknesses, with some pixel responses substantially slower than optimal and giving some ‘heavy powdery’ or ‘smeary’ trailing in places. Some models, including the AOC C24G1, have another trick up their proverbial sleeves. They include strobe backlight modes (called MBR or ‘Motion Blur Reduction’ on the AOC) which can greatly reduce perceived blur caused by eye movement, provided the frame rate matches the refresh rate. This concept and related aspects are explored in detail in our article on responsiveness.

IPS (In-Plane Switching), PLS (Plane to Line Switching) and AHVA (Advanced Hyper-Viewing Angle) panels​

When it comes to the end result these three technologies are essentially very similar; the key differences being that IPS technology is developed chiefly by LG Display, PLS technology by Samsung and AHVA by AUO. These are sometimes simply referred to collectively as ‘IPS-type’ panels.

Other panel manufacturers have their own ‘IPS-type’ technologies, including Innolux with their AAS (Azimuthal Anchoring Switch) technology – which, confusingly, also has VA-type iterations. And BOE with their IPS-ADS technology. The real selling point of these is their superior colour accuracy, consistency and viewing angles when compared to the other LCD technologies.

Each shade remains distinct with its own ‘identity’ regardless of its position on the screen. This is combined with extended colour gamuts (increasing potential shade range and saturation) on some models for a vibrant and saturated look throughout the screen.

Gamma consistency is also strong, ensuring dark shades appear largely appropriate throughout the screen rather than appearing too visible in some regions of the screen and far too masked in other regions. This consistency in both gamma and saturation makes IPS-type panels particularly good candidates for ‘colour critical’ work.

Those who appreciate colour-richness that’s well-maintained throughout the screen may enjoy using them for gaming, movies and general desktop work as well.

The image shows the same SpyderCHECKR 24 system used for the TN and VA examples earlier, this time on the ASUS PA278QV with IPS-type panel. The consistency is far superior to the TN example and improved compared to the VA example as well, with the shade sets on the left and right of the screen appearing relatively similar to one another.

SpyderCHECKR 24 on ASUS PA278QV IPS model


There is a very good range of affordable IPS-type monitors available from most major manufacturers, including Dell, LG, Acer, AOC and ASUS. This means that photographers, designers or just regular users on a lower budget can take advantage of the technology too.

Many modern IPS-type monitors are also far more responsive than their VA counterparts and in some cases are effective rivals to many TN monitors. Responsiveness was traditionally an area of significant weakness for IPS panels. Due to dramatic improvements in pixel responsiveness and refresh rate, some modern models have found favour amongst gamers who take advantage of the colour performance in their favourite titles without lots of unsightly trailing. 144Hz+ panels of this type are now common.

Another area of traditional weakness was contrast. There have been some improvements there, with most panels of this type similar to their TN counterparts in that department now (around 1000:1 contrast ratio without dynamic contrast). Some are a bit stronger, some a bit weaker. One troublesome issue that some people have noticed is a sheen or ‘glow’ when viewing dark content that is caused by the behaviour of light in these panels. This is typically most obvious when viewing ‘off angle’ as shown on the BenQ PD2705Q in the video below. You will generally be able to observe this on the corners of 21.5″+ models whilst viewing from directly in front, unless you are sitting quite far back from the screen. The majority of time you will be looking at brighter and more colourful shades where these displays excel but it is always worth looking beyond figures on paper.


Conclusion​

There are three main categories of panel used on modern LCD monitors; TN, VA and IPS-type. Up until quite recently TN was the most prevalent, offering decent image performance and high responsiveness at a decent price. VA sacrifices responsiveness, generally being the slowest current panel type but offering relatively strong contrast and improvements in colour performance over TN technologies. IPS, PLS and AHVA are the kings of colour offering the most consistent and accurate performance in this area whilst sporting excellent viewing angles, respectable responsiveness and reasonable contrast. Really it is up to the individual user to weigh up the advantages and disadvantages of the monitors they are comparing; understanding the general performance characteristics of different panels is a great starting point.

Further reading​

  • This post explores some of the key points of comparison between IPS and VA panels. Further discussion is included later on in that thread. The video below, taken from this thread, offers a good summary of these key differences.



  • The video below offers a visual comparison between an IPS-type panel and a TN panel. First perceived contrast differences are discussed and demonstrated, then colour performance is analysed in a similar way.
 
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lightgamer

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@crashnburn , for a PC use case I'd always go for an IPS monitor. Not only are the viewing angles better it also has better grey and white uniformity which is super important for web browsing or any kind of productive work.

However, if the use case is mostly multimedia (HTPC), go for VA hands down, get an adjustable mount and adjust it to view it head-on. IPS has too poor of blacks. to be any good for multimedia. And I'm typing this on a 4k HDR IPS monitor.

I'd generally not go for a TV for PC use case (except the LG OLEDs) since that's a rat's nest in terms of knowing which TV lacks what. Some don't do 4:4:4 chroma well, some have HDMI issues, some have input latency and ghosting issues and whatnot.

But if you want to explore and go for that, best of luck from my side. I'd either go for a monitor if I'm on a budget or the C9/CX 55" if I feel like splurging. Won't consider any other TV for my PC use case.
 

crashnburn

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@crashnburn , for a PC use case I'd always go for an IPS monitor. Not only are the viewing angles better it also has better grey and white uniformity which is super important for web browsing or any kind of productive work.

However, if the use case is mostly multimedia (HTPC), go for VA hands down, get an adjustable mount and adjust it to view it head-on. IPS has too poor of blacks. to be any good for multimedia. And I'm typing this on a 4k HDR IPS monitor.

I'd generally not go for a TV for PC use case (except the LG OLEDs) since that's a rat's nest in terms of knowing which TV lacks what. Some don't do 4:4:4 chroma well, some have HDMI issues, some have input latency and ghosting issues and whatnot.

But if you want to explore and go for that, best of luck from my side. I'd either go for a monitor if I'm on a budget or the C9/CX 55" if I feel like splurging. Won't consider any other TV for my PC use case.
Fair enough. I agree with your points mostly - in principle. And its a repeat of our previous discussions.

But as I mentioned before - This is a stop gap until I get a Fancy IPS 40/50" 4K or UW Monitor from the US / Maybe OLED - Maybe end of 2021 or 2022.

So the question is - how may it be possible to find TVs with IPS panels in the market? Focused Thoughts on this.

If one had to do this, how many one go about doing this?
 

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@Donivlapog -

@lightgamer

@BLASTO

- So I'm discovering things I had not seen at the get go..

IPS Panels.

LG - obvious maker
SONY - Some models
Philips - some models

Samsung - PLS - Not common - Maybe monitors

Current:
Sanyo
Motorola - launched this year
Vu (some previous Full HD models I think - Not sure about 4K)

RidaEx - Make in India, Non Certified Android TV with QLED IPS - 600 nits or so. Very intriguing.

I am inclined to find the right Extended Warranty to cover the Risk of the current Value Crop.
 

Donivlapog

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IPS is not the favourite panel type of many in this forum. They would just cringe if they are to be asked for a recommendation between the devil and the deep blue sea! Blasto and LG(lightgamer!) will be weary of this topic by now.
 

lightgamer

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@Donivlapog -

@lightgamer

@BLASTO

- So I'm discovering things I had not seen at the get go..

IPS Panels.

LG - obvious maker
SONY - Some models
Philips - some models

Samsung - PLS - Not common - Maybe monitors

Current:
Sanyo
Motorola - launched this year
Vu (some previous Full HD models I think - Not sure about 4K)

RidaEx - Make in India, Non Certified Android TV with QLED IPS - 600 nits or so. Very intriguing.

I am inclined to find the right Extended Warranty to cover the Risk of the current Value Crop.
The problem with going with RidaEX and other not known brands is that you might not know if it supports full 4:4:4 chroma or not. These TVs are made for TV use while you are going to use it as a PC monitor. For popular brands, their reviews will be available at rtings.

Also, since your use is PC, I don't think 600 nit brightness matters that much. You'll likely use it at 100-150 nits anyway.
IPS is not the favourite panel type of many in this forum. They would just cringe if they are to be asked for a recommendation between the devil and the deep blue sea! Blasto and LG(lightgamer!) will be weary of this topic by now.
WTF is wrong with you. If you got some bone to pick up with me, say it to my face instead of bad-mouthing me across the forum.

Also BTW, @crashnburn is looking for a TV for PC use. I've recommended IPS to him only since IPS is right for this use. I personally also use a 4k IPS monitor for my work because the needs are different. Contrast and HDR performance don't matter as a monitor, but screen uniformity and viewing angles do.
 

Donivlapog

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The problem with going with RidaEX and other not known brands is that you might not know if it supports full 4:4:4 chroma or not. These TVs are made for TV use while you are going to use it as a PC monitor. For popular brands, their reviews will be available at rtings.

Also, since your use is PC, I don't think 600 nit brightness matters that much. You'll likely use it at 100-150 nits anyway.

WTF is wrong with you. If you got some bone to pick up with me, say it to my face instead of bad-mouthing me across the forum.

Also BTW, @crashnburn is looking for a TV for PC use. I've recommended IPS to him only since IPS is right for this use. I personally also use a 4k IPS monitor for my work because the needs are different. Contrast and HDR performance don't matter as a monitor, but screen uniformity and viewing angles do.
Whoa! Hold it right there. Where tf have I badmouthed you in these lines of communication? I just said you would cringe upon recommending an IPS monitor. Don't wear your tempermental attitude in your sleeves. I defended you several times in this very forum when people found your authoritative talks a complete blasphemy. Don't simply call out alarms when there is no need for one. If you can read English, I haven't bad mouthed you anywhere. You on the other hand show superiority complex and have a pride and ego that can suck a black hole straight.
 

lightgamer

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Whoa! Hold it right there. Where tf have I badmouthed you in these lines of communication? I just said you would cringe upon recommending an IPS monitor. Don't wear your tempermental attitude in your sleeves. I defended you several times in this very forum when people found your authoritative talks a complete blasphemy. Don't simply call out alarms when there is no need for one. If you can read English, I haven't bad mouthed you anywhere.
I see, I probably misunderstood you then. Sorry about that. However, you shouldn't speak for someone else. I would never say on a thread that 'Donivlapog would say that'.
You on the other hand show superiority complex and have a pride and ego that can suck a black hole straight.
That's plain bullshit. I just don't like when folks refuse to accept facts and plain science. And I have no regrets for it.
 

Donivlapog

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Crashnburn addressed the three of us and having known your bias against ips panaels, I told it. And it is a generic tendency in this forum too that ips is inferior to va.
 

lightgamer

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Crashnburn addressed the three of us and having known your bias against ips panaels, I told it. And it is a generic tendency in this forum too that ips is inferior to va.
I'm not biased against IPS panels at all. I'm replying to you for this on an IPS panel which I love. and I actually advised Crashburn to go for an IPS panel.

Here's that reply above on the thread:
@crashnburn , for a PC use case I'd always go for an IPS monitor. Not only are the viewing angles better it also has better grey and white uniformity which is super important for web browsing or any kind of productive work.
I'd never use a VA panel for PC use. For multimedia it's either FALD VA or OLED (if you have cash). Both IPS and VA panels have their respective strengths.
 

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:D lots of love for you guys.. I think the planets are causing "mis understood" conflicts :D

I was just sharing that these are the IPS Panels I've found thus far -

Will start popping data into Excel sheet and start comparing; Pros Cons
 

Donivlapog

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@Donivlapog @BLASTO @lightgamer

Came across some Panasonic TVs online (said to be IPS). Any threads on the forum or in person experiences?
(The thread about GX800?)They are edge lit, VA panels, still good enough. Viewing angle is not good. But wide colour gamut WCG, hdr 10+, Dolby vision,Atmos. You won't get for this price, a Sony or Samsung and an ips LG panel at most. So good one.

Also address me either Vinod or Gopal. Doniv Lapog will only get you ulta-pulta answers :)
 
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crashnburn

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(The thread about GX800?)They are edge lit, VA panels, still good enough. Viewing angle is not good. But wide colour gamut WCG, hdr 10+, Dolby vision,Atmos. You won't get for this price, a Sony or Samsung and an ips LG panel at most. So good one.

Also address me either Vinod or Gopal. Doniv Lapog will only get you ulta-pulta answers :)
I had not imagined it was your divine name in reverse; it seemed more like Don Ivanoplog - Spanish noble like Don Alphonso or Don Juan De Marco :p
So which Panasonics are IPS in India, if any?

Which model? Link?
Your question is only slightly better than "I came across some tvs online, how are they"?
(in funny hyderabadi accent.. aka Soorma bhopali) Mian.. Yeah hi to khoj aur takalluf hai :p

If you recall the subjected intent of this thread is/ was to find the IPS panel using TVs (In India) - Brands, Series, Models.. so I'm trying to hone in. Esp since we dont have a RTings like DB of them all.

I wish I knew which ones are IPS, since Panasonic is barely talked / mentioned much on this forum, and only noticed its "presence" in StopTheFOMO's some videos about how Japan has them, and only some few are imported by SOME DEALER into US and how they are great and their high end is whats used for Color Grading/ Work by Studio Pros.

The last time I personally thought about Panasonic as a kid was way back before I moved to the US. Hence, I'm trying to seek the community buddies who may be more aware of Panasonic models in India that may have IPS/ that fit me.
 

etios

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I had not imagined it was your divine name in reverse; it seemed more like Don Ivanoplog - Spanish noble like Don Alphonso or Don Juan De Marco :p
So which Panasonics are IPS in India, if any?


(in funny hyderabadi accent.. aka Soorma bhopali) Mian.. Yeah hi to khoj aur takalluf hai :p

If you recall the subjected intent of this thread is/ was to find the IPS panel using TVs (In India) - Brands, Series, Models.. so I'm trying to hone in. Esp since we dont have a RTings like DB of them all.

I wish I knew which ones are IPS, since Panasonic is barely talked / mentioned much on this forum, and only noticed its "presence" in StopTheFOMO's some videos about how Japan has them, and only some few are imported by SOME DEALER into US and how they are great and their high end is whats used for Color Grading/ Work by Studio Pros.

The last time I personally thought about Panasonic as a kid was way back before I moved to the US. Hence, I'm trying to seek the community buddies who may be more aware of Panasonic models in India that may have IPS/ that fit me.

Stopthefomo is talking about Panasonic OLED not any IPS. The dealers name is value electronics: https://www.valueelectronics.com/si...eelectronics.com/Panasonic_Pro_OLED.html#2745
 

BLASTO

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(in funny hyderabadi accent.. aka Soorma bhopali) Mian.. Yeah hi to khoj aur takalluf hai :p

If you recall the subjected intent of this thread is/ was to find the IPS panel using TVs (In India) - Brands, Series, Models.. so I'm trying to hone in. Esp since we dont have a RTings like DB of them all.

I wish I knew which ones are IPS, since Panasonic is barely talked / mentioned much on this forum, and only noticed its "presence" in StopTheFOMO's some videos about how Japan has them, and only some few are imported by SOME DEALER into US and how they are great and their high end is whats used for Color Grading/ Work by Studio Pros.

The last time I personally thought about Panasonic as a kid was way back before I moved to the US. Hence, I'm trying to seek the community buddies who may be more aware of Panasonic models in India that may have IPS/ that fit me.
I don't understand hindi.. :) Iam from down south TN, not a native of hyderabad.
If you are looking for general info about panasonic in india, here you go.
Panasonic's are all IPS in india. Sold very few oleds too but quickly stopped for reasons only they know.
StopTheFOMO talks about global models which have VA.
If a company sells same series models with 2 different types of panels, it is a red flag right there.
Highest end IPS models of panasonic were selling in the 60k range for 55 inches during diwali. But highest end is a relative term, it is still edgelit and with poor blacks. Other brands have come a long way from where panasonic stand. IMO, they lost track after stopping plasma tv production.
Still you will get legendary panasonic cinematic picture processing, much above average build quality and arguably better long term reliability etc. If you can trade inherent deficiencies of edge lit IPS panels with the above virtues, it is yours. A lot of people are happy with the last year panasonic 8 series.
While they are good in 60k discounted range, should be avoided in 1L range. I would personally avoid any edge lit static backlight models at any price which would remove all of Panasonic's from my consideration anyway. An awesome cinematic picture processor coupled with edge lit panels falls directly in no man's land IMO.
 
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